Does recording voice-overs for food commercials make you salivate? Do hunger pangs appear out of nowhere when describing delectable dishes? We want to know!


voice-overs-for-food-commercials.jpgSitting down to read copy about food must be a salivating experience, and if you are recording long after you’ve eaten, which I’ve heard is very popular, it must also be like grocery shopping on an empty stomach.
Have you ever had a craving for the food you are pitching in a commercial while recording?
I wonder if that internal reaction would act as a subconscious catalyst when interpreting copy. It makes some sense that the longing or at least heightened interest in the copy you are performing would add more enthusiasm and genuine appeal to your overall performance.
In theory, your performance is supposed to conjure those cravings in a viewing audience, not induce them upon yourself! That being said, if others are being persuaded by the copy that you are reading, why couldn’t you, a fellow human being with the capacity to hunger and thirst, too?
voice-overs-espresso-commercial.jpgFollowing that stream of thought, it would be interesting to know if certain foods bring out more hunger than others when reading copy.
For example, you could have a commercial about a hearty, home-cooked meal, complete with roast beef, glazed vegetables, and mashed potatoes…
Perhaps it’s a commercial that targets people on the go, marketing quick fixes like fast food restaurant fare, take-out, or pop in the oven TV dinners. Or, it’s all about rich, creamy ice cream, pastries, and confections.
strawberries-and-voice-overs.jpgDepending on the time of day, if you have had anything to eat recently, where you are in proximity to food, and how appealing the copy is, you could be writing yourself a recipe for Death by Chocolate or find yourself running out the back door to the garden in search of some organic grub.
If you have had cravings while recording voice-overs for the food and beverage industries, what did you do, if anything, to indulge that craving after your session?
Cheers,
Stephanie

SHARE
Previous articleVoiceOverTimes Moderators Needed
Next articleSecond-hand recording studio equipment
Stephanie Ciccarelli is the Co-Founder and Chief Brand Officer of Voices.com. Classically trained in voice, piano, violin and musical theatre, as well as a respected mentor and industry speaker, Stephanie graduated with a Bachelor of Musical Arts from the Don Wright Faculty of Music at the University of Western Ontario. Possessing a great love for imparting knowledge and empowering others, her blog serves an audience what wants to grow in their careers as professional voice users, and more specifically, voice actors. Stephanie was recently listed on the PROFIT Magazine W100 list three times (2013, 2015 and 2016), a ranking of Canada's top female entrepreneurs, and is the author of Voice Acting for Dummies®.

3 COMMENTS

  1. Stephanie, you constantly impress me at how much you know about human behaviour. In fact, isn’t that in itself a good basis for being a successful voice-over talent? 🙂

  2. Hi Raj,
    Thank you for your comment and insight.
    I heartily agree. Being familiar with human behaviour, in turn, makes us capable of understanding how we can be of service to one another.
    Whether it be in the field of voice-overs or in other professions, your comment rings true, and rightfully so.
    Good observation!
    Take care,
    Stephanie

LEAVE A REPLY