Union VS. Non-union

share on facebook share on twitter share on linkedin

Which is better? Share your opinions!

The age old question… Should you join a union or remain a free agent.

Whether you wear your union status proudly on your sleeve or prefer to stay among the majority of folks working freelance and setting their own rates, we want to hear from you! The age old question of Union VS Non-union has reared its controversial head again, but there’s a different twist this time.

We want to hear why you are or are not a member of AFTRA, SAG, ACTRA, EQUITY, or other unions that represent artists for voice over work to help conduct a study.Interested? I received a request from a student writing a paper about the differences between union and non-union in the voice over field. Quite the topic, isn’t it?

Many professional talent endorse joining a union in order to get all of the career benefits that are available. Union work pays nearly twice as much money and provides retirement benefits and medical coverage that would not be available to non-unionized voice talents. Not only that, but some unions even act legally on a talents behalf should the need arise.

Although most career talent opt to go the union route, there are some very successful non-union talents. They may not receive the perks and benefits of the union, but they do save money on union initiation fees, dues, and often qualify to record more diverse and interesting work for smaller projects that pay non-union fees.

When it comes down to it, choose wisely depending on your personal circumstances. If you are only looking for a part-time job or intend to moonlight occasionally, refraining from joining the union may be the best decision for you.

If you are in voice-overs for the long haul and are embracing a career in the voice acting field, the union is an attractive option that will help you meet your goals, particularly if you have a family to provide for.

How can you help? By leaving a comment on this post (or sending it to me confidentially) about your experiences as union or non-union voice talent.

Here’s what others had to share about the pros and cons of joining the actor’s union.

When I first “had to” join AFTRA-SAG back in 1971, I was working with Ogilvy & Mather, McCann Erickson & others who required it. At that time I kept the union in the same balywick as my draft board… I wasn’t inclined to send them Christmas cards on 12/25. As I learned over the years… there are two sides to the issue.Although union rates & rules were designed to accommodate talent and get the pay scale where it should be etc, the union was often unrealistic. The big strike a decade ago was the killer.The union claimed “if you want professional talent, you must use union talent”. Well, of course, that just wasn’t always so and in the new millennium the semantics about who’s “good” or “professional” is up for grabs. The one undeniable GREAT feature about the union for me is the MEDICAL coverage. The BEST and the CLIENT pays it when you do a union job… so my coverage for me AND my wife has been first class at NO cost to me.For NEW talent being non-union will probably make it easier for you to get MORE jobs, but in the end, I’m not sure you REALLY come out ahead. If you really wish to answer those “sound of James Earl Jones for national TV paying $50” auditions.Well, keep your day job.

– Bob

I was forced to join AFTRA while working as a news & traffic announcer in San Francisco. They were ineffectual at best in that job capacity, yet as I started a second career as a voice over talent, I was being offered jobs that were all non-union. Let’s be honest, all the big gigs at a national level are being gobbled up by retired movie stars.A legal option was opting for “Financial Core”. The name is supposed to inspire confusion. It basically means you can work union AND non-union jobs. It is legal and be advised that you will still have to pay your union dues. YET, even though I was at a senior level in my radio career, I was the first to be laid off regardless of the station outrage.In a nutshell, the union AFTRA can, and will make your life a living hell should you choose Financial Core. How do they find out? You have to submit it in writing to the union on your status change. See, if you’re in a union and you do an outside gig and they find out, they can pile on some hefty fines.By selecting Financial Core, you’re safe from that, but not from the wrath of the union. I received downright hostile phone calls from some major people at AFTRA and was given 30 days to “change my mind”. I didn’t. A short time later, I was laid off from my job.Illegal? Yes. AFTRA was powerless in our union negotiations with the company in question and couldn’t care less. Although the union IN THEORY is a noble one, that is not mirrored in the current situation.About 95% of all my voice over work has been non-union work. The union would be necessary should a national gig come knocking, but I don’t think any of the multitude of movie stars that take these jobs would pass them along to us.

– Valarie

I was obliged to join two unions during my career in Boston radio and TV (NABET and IBEW). Neither of these unions were useful to my career in any way and in the end, I only felt resentful having to pay annuals dues for nothing. Better off to stay independent and away from unions that have little or no power or influence in America anymore.

– Nathaniel

In the San Francisco Bay Area there seems to be much more non-union than union VO and on-camera work available. So, if I want to work, it is not to my advantage to be in the union. Their rates, though are my goal in negotiations, while also keeping in mind the flexibility my non-union status affords.However, I also do stage work and am working on my Equity Candidacy points. For stage work, it would be an advantage to be AEA; but then there is that reciprocal union thing going on. In one way that’s very good: if you’ve proven yourself in one aspect of the business, you’re accepted as proven in other realms of the business. What’s to complain about? Membership opens some doors and closes others; that’s not a complaint, just a statement of fact.

– Elinor

Should it be Client or NO Client. If one searches out clients and offers them a commercial at a certain price say 300 dollars, you get and keep that client.Now if you belong to a Union, you have to offer the client a commercial at Union Rates, which might work out to 500 dollars. I’ve had many clients that want non union voices and only a few that want union.Wonder why.

– Bryan

Union is great I am in the unions SAG and AFTRA and to get a great union job that is residual paying is really what one aspires to do on a consistent basis, however I think the majority of producers right now are non-union and wanting to get talent that is non union to avoid the fees associated with the unions.This makes it difficult for someone who does this kind of work full time. I would suggest looking into Financial Core status so you can take advantage of jobs on all fronts. Getting into the first call rankings of union voice actors may take some time and exposure to achieve, so in the meantime you may need to take non-union jobs to get the much needed exposure that puts you in that top ranking.It can be a double edged sword at times as well because you work hard to have the union status you dreamed of and then not being able to reap the benefits/book solely union jobs, can not only be frustrating but impossible if you need to make a living as a voice actor.This is a quagmire… hopefully soon there will be some sort of middle ground where we can take advantage of all job opportunities without having to omit one or the other.

– Patty

In my 19 year career as a broadcaster, I’ve had the opportunity to join the union, but could never afford the dues. I am and will always be a non-union voice artist.Now, if I lived in LA or NYC, I may not get the work I would need to survive those jungles. But I do believe that a non-union status will help you pay the bills, you’ll just have to get lots and lots of work.

– Scott

I am a member of both AFTRA and SAG, and although these unions irritate me on occasion, I am proud to be a member. They guarantee a fair wage, provide health and retirement plans, and provide the professional voice performer with the opportunity to book major clients for television and radio broadcast.I feel there is a need for both union and non-union, and I feel there are good non-union performers. I do take issue with those “dollar a holler” “performers” in the non-union world whose race to the bottom helps no one. Union or non-union, this is a profession, and it should be taken seriously.Unfortunately, with the wide availability of cheap equipment these days, anyone who’s ever been told they have a nice voice can go out and buy a $79 USB microphone and claim to “do voice-over work.” Good VO performance takes experience, training, and persistence. It has become way to easy for anyone with a half-way decent set of pipes to throw his hat into the ring, and it can really lower the bar.I also take issue with the attitude that any work is fair game, union or non-union. You’re one or the other. What is the confusion here? Believe me, I’ve had to turn down quite a few jobs which were non-union, and I didn’t do it so that another willy-nilly union member could book it off the card.So whatever your opinion of the unions, ideally you will choose one or the other. And if it’s the non-union route that you choose, please do us all a favor and charge a respectable rate!

– Brett

As an AFTRA/SAG member of long-standing, it strikes me that a few points seem lost or overlooked in this discussion:

1) The basic reasons unions were created in the first place: to provide benefits and protections that as individual performers we could not readily create or sustain on our own: health insurance, pensions, minimum wages and working conditions, and the like; and to serve as a counter-weight to the tremendous power of employers in setting rates and working conditions, especially in our era of media-consolidation.

2) As human, democratic institutions unions of course aren’t perfect, and sometimes they disappoint or even fail their members. Yet they can only be as strong as their members commit to working in solidarity, accepting the need for compromise for the greater benefit of all, and care enough to elect good leadership and contribute to the union’s work. It’s painful to read the accounts of people who felt their unions let them down. But I can assure you that for every such report, there are plenty of situations where without the union stepping in to fight for a worker’s rights (for overtime pay, safe working conditions, freedom from workplace discrimination, freedom to compete for another job in the same geographic area, etc.), that actor or broadcaster would have been out of luck.

3) Financial Core status: a lot of misunderstanding here. FC really amounts to a legal loophole that allows non-members (people who have joined and then quit the union) to do both union and non-union work, often in the mistaken belief that they will save substantially on their dues. But even more important to understand is that the effect of working “financial core” is to undermine the union’s ability to protect performers, or even to exist. In effect, FC status allows these “non members” to take advantage of their brothers and sisters who remain committed to the union’s “one for all and all for one” spirit, members who say “no” to work unless it comes with a union contract and the minimum benefits and protections it provides. Meanwhile, FC performers, looking out only for themselves, reap the benefit of their fellow performers’ commitment as union members. Thus, while technically legal, FC status is a selfish and I believe unethical position. And, ultimately, self-defeating: after all, if everyone chose FC status, producers would have no incentive to work with union contracts and unions would disappear, leaving us all in that proverbial “race for the bottom.” (If you’re a union member now and considering FC status, I recommend that you talk not only with the union but also with some members who chose FC status, later realized their shortsightedness, and came back for reinstatement).

– Paul

I believe that unions first did a lot of good, but now they are more concerned about their own power than the individual’s right to make his/her own decisions over his/her career.Without unions, people could still band together on their own to demand fair treatment.What I find so interesting is that the purpose of the union was to make sure that actors were receiving fair pay and treatment.I believe that no actor, union or nonunion, should subject themselves to any abuse of power.There are often nonunion gigs that pay well and respect actors. So what’s the harm? There’s no harm to actors, only to the union’s power.I think the unions need to be honest with themselves about what they are fighting for.

– Ellie

I’m a member of AEA, AFTRA, and SAG, and, while I haven’t always agreed with the decisions of the governing bodies of those unions (and while there are paid staff in all three unions, the governing bodies are entirely made up of unpaid members donating their time), I have never felt that they were not working to further the interests of the membership at large. But because the union truly IS the membership, if enough members feel that the union is going astray or not addressing their concerns, they can vote the Councilors or Board Members out and replace them with those who represent their views more properly.

If there is a group of professionals more in need of representation by a strong union against managements which are often dragged kicking and screaming to the bargaining table, I can’t think of one.

Remember that there was a time when an actor would go out on the road with a show, and if the show closed, the actor was stranded wherever that happened, without any way home except what s/he could come up with out of his/her own funds, which were probably very limited because there were no minimum salaries. I, for one, don’t want to depend on the kindness of producers. Some of them may mean well, but their interests are not necessarily our interests, and without a union there would be no basic and hard-won benefits of employment: no minimum salaries, no limited work hours, no protection against hazardous working conditions or unreasonable dismissal, no medical insurance, no pension.

That’s what we, and our unions, are fighting for!

So, because the union IS the membership, harm to the union IS harm to actors. If we don’t stick together and demand our rights and protections we will lose them. And any union actor who works without a contract IS harming his/her fellow actors, because if producers feel that union actors will work without a contract, why on earth would any producer sign one?

– Paul

To get right to it, we need to build a list of the pros and cons of being a union member and also the pros and cons of being a non-union voice talent.

More voice talent shared their reasons here.

I froze my SAG/AFTRA cards a number of years ago… not that I don’t like many of things that the union provides, but the voiceover industry has changed dramatically… such that my paradigm had to morph as well.Now, I must say that I live in a “right to work state” thus I can work union jobs even though I am non-union. BUT, even if that was not the case, I have provided for a wife and two young girls on ALL NON-UNION work which I have received through Voices.com and another casting company… plus what little comes through my agent.If I were union, I would be obligated to turn down all those opportunities that, frankly, have grown into great working relationships that have yielded repeat business. As a matter of fact, I would venture to say that upwards of 80% of my business is repeat business.So, to answer the question of Union or Non-Union, I believe the altered voiceover landscape has dictated the path…non-union. NOW if, by the grace of God, I were to get an amazing longterm gig whereby it made prudent business sense to thaw out my union cards… I would consider it, but it would probably have to be the “once in a lifetime” type opportunity.I virtually never bid a job at the posted budget level… it’s always higher. I stick to the idea that the value of the audio is in the end use of it… thus, the rate is presented accordingly.So, for me… non-union is a must and my wife and kids eat very well as a result.

– Brian

Lots of people I know work on a “don’t ask, don’t tell” basis – keeping union status IF any such work comes up – while really making $ non union.Sad to say, the union has failed in its mission to the rank & file and is only catering to and offering its protection to those who make so much $ that the union is not really necessary. They have lawyers to work for them.It’s only in the area of safety that I fear for the union. They have protected us on those issues & set the standard (not an issue for VO).For years I was very loyal to the union, and DIDN’T WORK. To make any $ and keep myself alive in the industry I have had to be less scrupulous, alas…

– Ed

This question seems to come up a lot. I’ve always been non-union. I’ve also always lived in places that were non-union/right to work states. I’m fortunate in that I’m covered under my husband’s health insurance and benefits, so that isn’t an issue. Having never been union, I can’t speak to any advantages/disadvantages.I do like setting my own rates and seeking out my own work. I feel I have total control. However, I appreciate knowing the ‘union’ standards for fees, as I try to keep mine very close.Sometimes, however, a job will pop up that is just a blast to work on, and I have no issue accepting lower pay (NO – I don’t mean $50!). I guess that’s the advantage to being non-union… you have no one to answer to… and no annual fees!

– Kara

Working union means you’re signed to a collective agreement negotiated with producers who’ve dedicated themselves to working in a completely professional environment… with wages and working conditions that are fair considering the revenue generated for the producer from the use of your talent.When performing on videogames, animation, radio or tv commercials for national brands, you’re just being exploited if you work for the $100 – $300 many of the producers soliciting performers on some Internet casting sites offer you… it tells the world what YOU think you’re worth – and sets a very low standard for the industry and your future.If a company is making millions when your talent convinces people to buy a product, or people get invested in a show because of your voice – don’t you feel exploited letting them pay you $300? Isn’t it only fair you get a share of the pie you helped bake?At any price, non-union commercial work pays you once (with no residuals) and then they can use your work FOREVER. Seems good when you need money to pay the rent this month, but it can prevent you from doing other work you’ll want to pursue in the future. When Fabric Softener A is running your spot for 5 years, and a gig for Fabric Softener B comes along – they can’t hire you.And going Fi-core means you’re resigning from the union – you can’t legally say you’re a member of Screen Actors Guild or AFTRA on your resume. You’ll also have to pay a hefty fee to rejoin, and there’s no guarantee the Guild or AFTRA will even allow you to rejoin.Think about whether you’re in this for the long term, or just doing voiceover work for hobby money. There’s no crime in making acting a hobby, but if you work non-union all your life.. it’s really JUST a hobby – and that’s all it can ever be if we allow companies to set our worth at a pittance… while they make millions.

– David

I was all set to join AFTRA–the benefits posted online seemed great, dues were high, but seemed worth it. I’ve been in this business for more than 25 years, and thought I was ready to take the next big step. However, I e-mailed AFTRA for more info, then e-mailed them again, and yet again. Then several weeks later I left a voice mail message. Then another. After a few months (like 3), I got an e-mail response from someone saying to contact them for more information. Sheesh.After that poor introduction, I started asking other union talents I’ve worked with if it is really a good deal. Every one of them gave me a resounding NO! One said he only gets about 4 or 5 jobs a YEAR that are union jobs, and the other said even with 3 agents working for her, she doesn’t get any union work!Perhaps the unions should read all of these postings and see there are definite problems in the industry. I’m not always happy with the sometimes low-ball price I am offered for voice work, but I am working steadily–enough to make a living–and that’s saying a lot!

– Robin

I’ve been fortunate in that I’ve always done my voice work on a part-time basis and so never had to rely on a constant flow of jobs.During my working career, however, I’ve belonged to the IBEW (forced to join) and AFTRA. In IBEW we Broadcast Technicians were considered as “bastard children”. There was never any attempt to get us anything during negotiations. They did, though, gladly accept our dues!While working in our nation’s capital I joined AFTRA in an attempt to jump-start my voice-over/narration career. I think AFTRA was a useful tool at one time but, let’s face it; they’ve priced themselves out of competition for all but the largest of projects.When I retired from my “day job” I went inactive with AFTRA.I’ll give AFTRA this; they have great organizational skills and they take good care of their members on a shoot.

– Ron

And, the award for the longest comment goes to Bob.

I started this response at least three to four weeks ago folks, but when addressing the union question, one can not just say yeah or neigh, believe me!!After 40 plus years in the business ( 30 of which were mostly union, as my career started in TV production and morphed to Radio) I think that I can safely say that I agree with most of what Bob Green has said. Although, I believe that even he would have to edit his comments about those “benefits being free” ( paid for by the client [especially of late]). A quick look at your pay stub will put that in perspective. Still, the client does pay the bulk of it.There are so many factors contributing to the staying power of Unions, none the least of which is the fact that once you are in the union; and, therefor accustomed to little things like a viable retirement structure plus medical benefits in time of need, it is tough to avail yourself of the aforementioned perks. This is especially true if an illness creeps into the picture over time! Those “preexisting illness clauses can be daunting. I can say that when I got pretty sick many years ago that, had it not been for a union benefits program, I could have really taken a hit. As Bob Green put it the benefits were there; and, yes they surely seem like it was free, comparatively.My sense is that if so many of the “hobbyists”, who in many cases do a respectable job, would think before they agree to “a dollar a holler”, unions might not have such a strong appeal. They do dictate rates and for the most part keep producers and talent alike, honest. If people would just think before they give their services away; but, they get desperate and hungry and that is where things go down the drain.Regarding the relative cost of our benefits, the “free” part of the equation has shifted pretty dramatically over the past several years … upward on the cost scale. Is it still a good deal, comparatively? Try finding your own benefits package and see if it matches, dollar for dollar what you might get through the union. No, all unions packages are NOT EQUAL !! I have heard that AFTRA is not quite as “talent friendly” as SAG. ‘Should of put more billing through SAG for sure; and tried to establish two benefit plans as some of my friends have done. ‘Coulda, ‘Shoulda, ‘Woulda, …… the age old scenario plays itself out over and over. Further, the qualifications (annual talent billing of jobs channeled through the union (AFTRA) are getting higher and higher. On top of which is the fact that our industry is a very “age aware”, dare I say biased, which makes it harder and harder for the “older” less viable talent to crack that annual nut to qualify for said benefits.Earlier on I mentioned that 30 of the 40+ years of my career was as a union member ( mostly ). I had a stint as a Fi Core member. Did I regret that decision? Not really, at the time. My decision to leave was driven by my dissatisfaction with union officials at the time; and their obvious lust for power and self promotion. Going Fi Core seemed like my only real way to protest, without shooting myself in the foot in terms of benefits (health and retirement). Once you are vested, those benefits are locked in; and, you are still contributing to your health plan which maintains another critical part of the “union benefits”. You see, as a FI Core member you give up your right to vote in union elections for starters. You also do not get union news releases. So?, you say. Exactly!! If those in power are going to push issues through without really considering the “talent / working stiff” relative to the market in which the talent plies his/her craft; and, how those increasing rates (through the ceiling) will negatively impact the talent’s ability to compete with “non union” sorts, you have two choices. One is to stay and play by rules with which you do not agree; or, leave and try to compete fairly in the marketplace. This, by the way, has become even more daunting of late with the internet.The union is like any other “business”: there are always going to be those who will sacrifice others well being to get ahead, whether that is buy trying to grow their “domain” at the risk of efficiently managing the job at hand and growing efficiently.So, what are your options? If you are just starting out you might consider incorporation which is not without its own set of headaches. Remember though, this is a business; and with doing business comes certain fiscal duties. The issue of Fi Core has changed a little over the years; and may not be quite a easily adopted. Further, in order to become Fi Core you still have to join a union ( AFTRA or SAG ); and the entry fees are rather stout! Remember, you have to spend some money to make money, regardless of the business.Well, I think that I have about run out of “words of wisdom” for now. I hope that this has helped you weigh your options more efficiently. Some choices can be amended as you go; but remember that life is full of little changes which might not seem that consequential at the time. Don’t you believe it for a minute. As your life changes today, be in in terms of health or wealth, it will not doubt impact you further down the road. Your job is to heed all of the signs as you travel; and, be ready to react “before” you come to that “unseen” curve.

– Bob

What does AFTRA have to say?

AFTRA add their comments to this debate.

Why Should You Join the Union? Here’s One Good Reason.There is a tendency, particularly among producers, clients and the general public, to think of actors as overpaid; especially those darn UNION actors who get big fat royalties and residuals and sit around eating bon-bons while waiting for the mailman to bring their next batch of checks.I will admit that some of my happiest moments are when I receive a residual check for a commercial or a web video that was shot one or two years ago. It’s like manna from heaven, only you can pay bills with it.But do I deserve it? I mean, I may have only been in the studio for a few hours, and here I am, lo these many moons later, getting gravy on top of my mashed potatoes – because of a job for which I have already been paid.

Here’s the short answer: You bet I do.Aside from the fact that local commercials really don’t pay much in the first place, the question often on the produce’s mind is, “Why should you get paid again? You’ve already been paid! And it only took you 45 minutes to do it in the first place! Sheesh!!”Or words to that effect.

This attitude is understandable; after all, most people work at a job and do X and receive Y for it. If your X is worth $20 an hour, at the end of X40, you get 800’s. But when it comes to acting, some people expect the equation to be the same – act for 2 hours, get paid for two hours. After all, it’ not like you’re digging ditches or curing Cancer! All you’re doing is talking! And in some cases, you’re not even doing that!

Well, It’s a simple equation, and I’m sure most actors already know it;Value Received = Value Given.Let’s say you’re the butcher in a cute little shop on the corner of a Norman-Rockwell-American town. In walks Mrs. McGillicuddy and buys a beautiful smoked ham. She gives you $35 for the fine piece of maple-cured goodness and out she goes, everybody happy. Well, a month goes by and in walks Mrs. M. and says, I’d like another one of those hams, please! You graciously wrap up a ham just like the first one and hand it to her. “Oh, thank you!” Says Mrs. M., and out she walks. “Hey! Wait a minute!” you say, “Aren’t you going to pay for that? To which she responds, “I paid you last month! You don’t expect me to pay AGAIN, do you?

Being a good shopkeeper who doesn’t want to go out of business, you snatch the ham from her grasp and indicate in no uncertain terms that if she wants your ham, she’s going to have to pay for it again.And that is what we call residuals.Not many moons ago, the economy in this country came out of the ground; it was an agriculturally-based economy, with fortunes being made in the growth and sale of commodities like cotton, wheat, sorghum, pork bellies etc.

The next economic wave was industrial; steel, machines, cars, durable goods. The tide then shifted rapidly to a service economy; accounting, consulting, IT, programming and other jobs where no one gets dirty. America moved with great rapidity through these economic phases, in each case leaving the old economy workers in the proverbial dust.Well, the economic tide has turned once again; our economy has moved to an information-based economy, or “Intellectual Property.” According to Ernst & Young, Intellectual Property will be the primary force of the GNP before the decade is out. It has already surpassed all manufacturing sectors, and is growing more than twice as fast as all other economic segments.What does that have to do with us? Everything.

What we do (acting) is not a product, nor is it a service – it is intellectual property. Once your image and likeness or your voice is recorded on tape, film, or straight to ones and zeros on a hard drive, it is no longer your time in the studio, nor your presence in the sound booth that is providing the value; it is the intellectual property itself. And that is the ham you’re selling.

Many times I have performed in a commercial only to find it being reused in the local market or I discover it being used in another market altogether. I also have found spots re-cut for a completely different advertiser. In one case, I ended up selling paint for a hardware store chain in Quebec, and I was speaking French! Sacre Bleu!

If not for the courage of the fearless Union, I would not have received anything for these continued uses of my image, likeness and voice.The point, my dear readers, is that you should never feel you are being unreasonable to expect to be paid appropriately for the value you provide, regardless of when or how you provide it.

Trust me, the products being sold aren’t being given away for free, the ad agency isn’t working gratis, and the TV station doesn’t give up air time for nothing.Non-union jobs simply don’t pay residuals, and you are not protected against unlimited use of your intellectual property. The union helps you retain those rights and be paid for those reuses. Performing non-union work simply leaves you with no protection at all.The moral of this story? Just because you’re a ham doesn’t mean you should give it away for free.

Mike Kraft VP AFTRA Cleveland

Looking forward to your thoughts on this very passionate subject.

Does anyone have comments for or against either of these options?

share on facebook share on twitter share on linkedin

Related articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comments

  • Tammy Morse
    March 13, 2007, 2:55 pm

    I am writing a paper for school on union vs non-union, if you have any information that you could send me on both sides I would really appreciate it. Thank you.

    Reply
  • Sharon
    November 3, 2008, 3:33 pm

    When unions were first formed they had a very positive impact in protecting worker’s rights. Now, unions have actually turned into “cash cows” and have really hurt the majority of Americans. Higher wages means higher prices. I believe that is one reason the auto industry is in trouble today and why so many manufacturing jobs have disappeared. Unions are known for intimidation tactics and I truly believe that taking away employees right to vote with a secret ballot will lead to very serious problems, including injuries or possible deaths of people who do not want to unionize.

    Reply
  • Steve
    December 10, 2008, 3:36 am

    truly believe that taking away employees right to vote with a secret ballot will lead to very serious problems, including injuries or possible deaths of people who do not want to unionize.
    Posted by: Sharon November 3, 2008 3:33 PM
    You have to be kidding me, this is not 1930 anymore. How about joining a union and seeing first hand how they operate. 99% of people against unions have never been in one. But know everything about them. How about all the good they have done for charitys and non-profit orginizations. Look at what just happened to the workers at the window factory, company just closes the doors and say’s to bad tuff luck, guess what is happening now???

    Reply
  • M H
    October 12, 2009, 10:05 am

    Unions are what are killing this country. They are soley based on employees emotions for the now. Ever wonder why so many factories have closed and head over seas, Union impact fees, they have crushed small America and the principles that this great country was founded upon.

    Reply
  • Josh
    May 5, 2010, 8:31 pm

    Unions you get training, benefits and good pay.
    With non-union, they employer pays you maybe the same on the take home only, usually a lot less but guess what? They charge you out at the same rate as unions at least here in alaska.
    You know the only thing that gives unions a bad name is non union switching over and showing that they know nothing…but it must be the unions fault!
    Its all about continuing education as to where you never stop learning in a trade.
    Unions are there to protect the worker. Period. Yeah there are some good non union workers out there but the majority are not. Yeah I get paid a lot because I go to training classes all the time, read code, books, study, practice on my own, go to school and make myself familiar with a product and I do things right the first time instead of 5 times. That is why Union makes the bucks.
    If you’ve had a bad experience with a union, its probably a few members or a crap state, I surround myself by quality craftsmen instead of scabs.

    Reply
  • Musiclady420
    May 6, 2010, 11:55 am

    The thing I don’t like about unions is the cliques that they form!!!! I have been in one and it sucks!!! Now my fiance who has been off of work for a year now has tried to get into a drivers union and they won’t let him!!!! But we know a man who was in the Laborers Union and received paid training to switch to the Drivers Union! He had no experience driving a truck! My guy has been a driver for 5 years now and the Drivers Union wouldn’t give him the time of day because he wasn’t currently in a union! Also, he had previously been in a Drivers Unoin in Chicago and when he lost his job they did nothing for him! So, for all you who are in a Union I don’t care about what you say about them being so good. The only reason you are there is because you knew someone!!!!

    Reply
  • CNA132
    June 25, 2010, 1:35 am

    I have actually been on both sides of the spade and I will tell you that the unions are a thing of the past. They are not for the worker “now” they are for the worker “1930” I was working at a hospital and I went on Vacation, when I got back they voted a union in. I had the “choice” to either join or opt out paying a fee. I opted out and they had me fired! They protect who? The lazy workers that dont normally do their job. I am a Certified Nurses Aide and I have worked with some pretty sh!tty aides. People you wouldn’t even think of taking care of your dog let alone your loved ones, and unions protect these people. Once they are in they are in and there is NOTHING you can do. On the other hand, I worked in places that didn’t have a union and everything went SOO much smoother. They lie when they tell you that they pay more and they demand more. Wal~mart’s starting pay one in 2006 was (and this is in Michigan) $9.50 to start. that’s above minimum wage. While Meijers across the street (same kind of store) started out at $7.50. Whenever there was a problem with the scheduling, you could take it up with your supervisor and get the problem straightened out, you can’t do that if you’re in a union. All the bargaining was up to them. Unions are nothing but money hungry liars! Their fees keep going up and they do NOTHING for you. So what if they helped out with a charity or two. Most of us do that anyway. They have to do something to keep their heads above water, otherwise they would drown themselves……..does anyone have a boulder? I need to weigh something down! LMAO

    Reply
  • RS
    September 2, 2010, 6:38 am

    I was in an Ironworkers Union for 4 years before our wonderful government let the economy drop and all the work dried up. My personal opinion is that Unions like the Kroger “Union” don’t need to exist. It’s a company union and yes they will roll you over. However builders unions are here to make sure the buildings we put up don’t fall down on your head instead of a bunch of untrained uneducated yahoos slapping crap up like we are having now. Its true and I agree we are a dying breed and we probably won’t see unions too much longer. Let me tell you this though, I was making around 25$ an hour plus benefits and retirement, this was paid to me and my fellow union ironworkers because we made buildings, bridges, roads, etc that didn’t fall apart on you. Now when you say that unions are full of lazy people I say wake up, there are way more people who aren’t in the union who are just as lazy. Mc Donalds doesn’t have a union and I can’t go thru the drive thru without having to ask for a straw to drink my coke, now that’s lazy. It’s not like the job is hard or requires rocket science. Another thing, I’ll tell you why companies are going overseas, it’s because they pay workers there next to nothing and give them nothing and its hurting us and all people can do is blame the unions. Well everyone is in for a rude awakening when the unions are gone and it keeps happening. The unions stood for the people; it’s as simple as that. It’s not the union’s fault that we as Americans want to be lazy and have other countries to work for us. Look at anything made now days. Where does it come from? Taiwan, China, Japan, Mexico, Germany, Sweden, and where ever else you can think of. We need to get up off our lazy bums and stop sucking on the welfare of the government and start doing something before this country gets sold off… What would you do with 300 trillion dollars? That’s how big our deficit is and growing. Sooner or later we will be calling this country the United States of China. Wahoo yay communism! How about we put aside the stupid Republican/Democrat bull crap and get some conservative people, and I mean real conservative people, not the Republicans who call themselves conservative. Maybe then we can get back to what matters with us, US and not every other country that is starving for attention. They were here before the USA and I’m sure they will be just fine without us. It’s hard to be patriotic to a nation that is slowly selling its self out. Thank you and have a wonderful night…
    P.S. Actual Unions Good! (Not Kroger unions) Non-unions well you’ll find out when the building falls down. Look up Non-union disasters.

    Reply
  • Jim V.
    October 14, 2010, 2:08 pm

    Quality of work union or non-union is a non issue. There are good and bad workers in both. What we need to know is were and how do unions find there workers, who is acceptable and what do others who apply to a union but are not accepted do for a living? It seems anyone can join a union, qualified or not provided they force a non-union shop or workplace into a union. Again who hires the workers not accepted by the union? Were did most of the union employees receive there training, union or non-union? Do union employees hire and support only union companies for there personal projects and repairs or is this to expansive? Are union workers more successful then non-union workers? Should a union worker be allowed to work a non-union job for less money? Should a non-union company be allowed to hire a union worker? What happens when we have more government employees then other workers, were does this funding come from? What happens when North America becomes like the UK or the european union and looses all manufacturing including the auto industry? What happens when one state or province is financially stronger then others, does North America become many small first, second and third world countries? Who hires the people without a trade, should there be a non-trade-union? What future will our children and grand children have if we have no manufacturing jobs, should we have a union for the unemployed? The province of Quebec mostly union, why is there a large underground economy, are they hired by union workers? We worry about global warming, consider our children’s future by keeping the wages reasonable, the manufacturing in North America. Jim V.

    Reply
  • Pat
    November 11, 2010, 8:09 pm

    I would like to leave a brief comment. People who belong to unions have better healthcare. The substantial part of that money comes from other union members, it is a part of our payment salary and is negotiated into our payment contract; most higher paid union members are skilled tradesmen and have gone through extensive apprenticeships (5 years in my case) to earn that higher wage; If it wasn’t for unions the minimum wage would be a few bucks less than what it is today; If it weren’t for unions the government would decide on working conditions, and not the people who do dangerous work and there would be no standards (OSHA). I have many more things to add, but said I would like to keep this brief in my 1st sentence. In closing not all of us union working are loads. We keep the economy as strong as possible by building plants and buildings for other people to work in. We are politically active and work the polls voluntarily (even though a lot of that political business is annoying) and we have live to lead in this diplomatically difficuly world.
    Sorry it wasn’t that short.

    Reply
  • Anonymous
    January 18, 2011, 5:54 pm

    unions dont back up there talk ive been in union local 21 out of chicago for the past 12 years and the company i work for uses non union subs on more than half their jobs so my boss doesnt have to pay benefits both locals have been told about what my boss is doing at least 5 times in past 7 years and nothing has changed me and my coworkers have been laid off since and the non union subs continue to do work acting as if they were union

    Reply
  • Dogma
    February 3, 2011, 5:13 pm

    Response to this ridiculous statement.
    You have to be kidding me, this is not 1930 anymore. How about joining a union and seeing first hand how they operate. 99% of people against unions have never been in one. But know everything about them. How about all the good they have done for charitys and non-profit orginizations. Look at what just happened to the workers at the window factory, company just closes the doors and say’s to bad tuff luck, guess what is happening now???
    Posted by:
    Steve December 10, 2008 3:36 AM
    First the comment states a year, 1930s, and suggests that violence from unions doesn’t occur today as it did in the 30’s. Walmart employees might disagree, as would all the Bond holders of GM stock, and employees of AIG.
    Second, 99% of union opposition never belonged to a union? I belong to two of the biggest unions as do most of my associates and we all agree that if not for the intimidation from union leaders and union snitches we wouldn’t be on the streets picketing with ACORN, Socialists, Commununists… at the Washington DC rally 2010.
    When thousands of unionized companies go out of business because the owner just can’t afford to keep paying ridiculous salaries and benefits you don’t hear about them, but when a single private company goes out of business the unions make a big deal about, that one.
    Bottom line unions were fine when people were abused in the 30’s. due to lack of education Today however our population as a whole is very smart when it comes to business, we aren’t as ignorant as the people of the past. But as unions sneak into the educational system we may be headed back to the “Stupid Days of Yesteryear”

    Reply
  • soxfan
    February 12, 2011, 6:45 pm

    Dogma, get a clue… the unions are more necessary now than ever. Corporate greed is the culprit. Companies such as Walmart (and companies that follow their business model) are to blame. Greed is destroying the middle class. It is immoral and unethical. Shipping jobs oversea to China to increase profits due to paying an average of .60 cph is the problem. Not the unions wanting a decent living wage and a little something to retire on… You claim the country as a whole is nore educated, I beg to differ. Without unions, good people can be fired anytime and for any reason. There are no protections, no job security nothing. At my plant a 22 year employee was fired for making too much money. The reason they lied about was performance (he was a porter). He was there every day, and did a damn good job. However he was also the highest paid employee in the building. What did they do after? Scabbed his work to a temp service.
    Without the unions, we would have no 40 hour week, no holiday pay, sick time, or other benefits. At the rate this country is going, we will all be working for labor ready scabbing work while the greedy fatcats keep filling their pockets….
    use your heads…

    Reply
  • Sparky
    February 28, 2011, 6:46 pm

    Without the unions, we would have no 40 hour week, no holiday pay, sick time, or other benefits. At the rate this country is going, we will all be working for labor ready scabbing work while the greedy fatcats keep filling their pockets….
    use your heads…
    we now have 40 hour weeks, holiday pay, sick time, overtime, and benefits. you are correct we NEEDED unions.
    we dont now
    thanks.

    Reply
  • thekux
    March 10, 2011, 11:46 pm

    I have been on both non and union. When I woked union, the healthcare was very expensive almost 800 a month for just me and the deductables were rediculously high.I recieve No holiday or sick pay at the union shops I worked in, I am a HVAC technician by trade. I went to trade school and worked non union most of my life. Unions will keep going down the toilet as long as they are lap dogs for the democrats. the public sector unions are a joke in the high tax states, which is why those states are losing population. It also comes down tot he employers, I’ve seen bad shops in both union and non union, comes down to the company you work for.People will go to the best job offer union or non union, with less than 6% of private work force unionized, that # will keep going down with the terrable leadership in unions now.

    Reply
  • thekux
    March 11, 2011, 8:29 am

    I have been on both non and union. When I woked union, the healthcare was very expensive almost 800 a month for just me and the deductables were rediculously high.I recieve No holiday or sick pay at the union shops I worked in, I am a HVAC technician by trade. I went to trade school and worked non union most of my life. Unions will keep going down the toilet as long as they are lap dogs for the democrats. the public sector unions are a joke in the high tax states, which is why those states are losing population. It also comes down tot he employers, I’ve seen bad shops in both union and non union, comes down to the company you work for.People will go to the best job offer union or non union, with less than 6% of private work force unionized, that # will keep going down with the terrable leadership in unions now.

    Reply
  • Dom PACE
    June 3, 2011, 10:03 am

    UNIONS STAND FOR A DESCENT WAGE .ALLU NON UNION GUYS DONT KNOW WHAT THAT MEANS DO U?

    Reply
  • pipefitter
    June 4, 2011, 9:09 pm

    I have been in a non union fire sprinkler fitting company for 3+ years now and i have never been bent over so much in my life. even after 3+ years i still get paid less then a first year sprinkler fitter that is in the union!! My benefits are only 80%( not too much of a concern) and I have never seen a dime of overtime pay even in a 50 hour work week. yet somehow they put overtime on our pay stubs and fudge the numbers around to make it look like they pay overtime so they don’t get in trouble from the labour board or whoever. me and a few other employes are really quick when it comes to work and bust our ass and yet in return we get yelled at for not producing enough. we are currently on a big highrise that’s about a 3 year project (22 story 600000 square feet) and you think on a job like that, one that’s going to make the company a lot load of money when they only have 4-5 guys from our company working on it from start to finish, that they would have the kindness to supply us a water cooler for our 4-5 man crew on those 35-40+deg c hot humid days?? NO!! They say it would cost to much and that we need to buy it ourself. And they are so greedy that they only pay us once every 2 weeks!! Im tired of being screwed around a putting money into their boats while im running for them living pay check to pay check and just making bills ( seriously!!) A few of us employes managed to get together and get the union involved and after a year of our bosses trying to fight the union off in court, our bosses lost and we are now union. Because we just got switched into the union, nothing has changed yet like pay or hours. Any body been in the same situation or would have some input, it would be a great help because i have no idea whats going to happen and am currently in the dark with the other employes because our bosses are not saying anything because they are too mad at us.

    Reply
  • Woody
    June 11, 2011, 7:00 am

    Listen to you people saying we don’t need unions NOW!! what!! Just because you have sick days and vacations now we should get rid of them! Are you soft! Go talk to an economist and ask them why Europe’s labor movement is much stronger that our! There unions are stronger! They have way less jobs being shipped out Due to people sticking together and putting their foot down and saying NO. I have a family and bills and I helped build this company with my brothers sisters fathers and mothers and you can’t take that away. I’m so sick of reading this crap about we not needing unions. People that say that are the ones who couldn’t pass the basic aptitude test! Basic math! But let me break it down for the guy who started this thread – my father-father-in law and me are in the union. Living great and working hard for what we are paid. Others I know who are not in a union do drugs-drink all day and live in there moms basement. I will give you odd people who say there are a lot of lazy people in the union-downfall to a lot of big union shops is that they get a lot of guys who are always at the hall looking for work because perhaps they have made a bad name for themselves not working as hard as the rest. Until a big shop lands a big job and just needs bodies on the job to work with there regulars. Other than that-don’t sell yourself short and allow anyone to try to get you to believe your not worth what your worth. Always demand the best for you and your family.
    -Woody

    Reply
  • Michael G Pollock
    August 10, 2011, 6:18 pm

    You can bet that most or all the union bashers have never been in one, or know anything about them. Most of them drive imported cars, and love Wal-Mart

    Reply
  • Kervin
    August 25, 2011, 2:35 pm

    To all you UNION haters & bashers. If it had not been for UNIONS you would not even have what you have now . You would be working 10-12 hrs a day , 7 days a week for pennies with no benefits. Do you have a good retirement ? No . Do you have good health benefits , like medical insurance , dental insurance , vision insurance , perscription drug insurance ? No . Are you provided training at no cost ? No . Is your work place a safe work place ? Probably not . So why are you so against UNIONS . Non union employers charge just as much as UNION employers the only difference is non union employers stick the extra money in their pockets where UNION employers have to share with employees due to the UNION. RETIRED 38 years in the elevator industry. Member of the INTERNATIONAL UNION OF ELEVATOR CONSTRUCTORS. So you UNION haters & bashers keep digging , scratching & taking what your employer gives you.

    Reply
  • Union Pipefitter
    September 28, 2011, 2:49 am

    “we now have 40 hour weeks, holiday pay, sick time, overtime, and benefits. you are correct we NEEDED unions.
    we dont now”……This is my favorite anti union comment
    When we build a house we know exactly what we want but there has to be a starting point, we have to start somehwere, so we start with the foundation. After the foundation is set we build upon it. We build the rest of the house, the house is now complete. We now have exactly what we want. But what would happen if we were to take the foundation away? Hmm let me “use my head” to figure this out…. the house would crumble and fall to the ground and that very house that we built with our blood sweat and tears, that very house that we finally had the exact way we wanted it would be gone in an instant with no foundation.
    Labor Unions are the foundation of America. Union workers earned and fought for “40 hour weeks, holiday pay, sick time, overtime, and benefits”. If we do away with our foundation, the labor unions, we do away with the exact things that we want, which are….. “40 hour weeks, holiday pay, sick time, overtime, and benefits”. So Sparky, when labor unions become a thing of the past because “we don’t need them anymore”. Guess what else will become a thing of the past?
    Yup you guessed it ….”40 hour weeks, holiday pay, sick time, overtime, and benefits”
    UA Local 486 says you’re welcome for……….
    “40 hour weeks, holiday pay, sick time, overtime, and benefits”

    Reply
  • Leppard
    January 13, 2012, 11:08 pm

    LOL brainwashed idiots -please realize any person against Real Labor Unions are non union Hacks just writing down words hoping to turn other non union idiots against — the real unions -Unions =Fair pay and benefits that every working American deserves -Union orkers are the skill and talent that builds this country -why would anyone work at the mercy of a huge corporation hoping they will give you more -Unons make the wage that allow you to live a very good life if your willing to learn and work for it –Wake up America without Unionized Labor -we all would b making minimum wage and working alot more hours possibly for free to just keep a job —

    Reply
  • Pancho Villa
    February 22, 2012, 7:32 pm

    I come from euope and we have a union company in the states. From what i see I can agree that they are lazy workers. They care about theirselfs and not about the company. The company tries to grow but with a union like this you are not flexibel at all so the grow potential is low. If you grow you have more jobs but some how this union really doesn’t care or understand. I can tell you each time i come home and i tell the examples what i have seen with the union they laughing hard and say that they still living in the 1930’s.. This union says they are an international union because of the globalizing of the world, well trust me, they do not know how it works outside the USA.

    Reply
  • the mad worker
    May 3, 2013, 2:08 am

    i just recently started working for a non union company about 2 months ago and i have to say non union labor facilities are the worst. after working in the UAW for 13 years and now working here i don’t see how people do it.. there is very little benefits , vacation time, not to mention the supervisors think they can treat u any kind of way because they know if u don’t go along with what they want they will just fire you … I believe someone said in a earlier post that we need unions now more then ever they are dam right we do… UNIONS THEN ,,,, UNIONS NOW,, UNIONS FOREVER

    Reply
  • Todd
    November 12, 2013, 2:29 am

    I’m non union and proud of it. I have a decent wage, good health benefits, and a good retirement plan. I just got my proud non union home sign and stuck in my front lawn. Now, I will thank those who developed the union way back when and got us the 40 hour work week, OSHA, and other benefits, but that was way back then. So, I won’t thank the current union workers for that. You did nothing! We now have laws for these things thanks to those who stood up to Carnegie and the likes back then. Many of my friends are union, and they give me the “decent wage” argument all the time. They make $40+ an hour being union. Good for them, but that is far more than decent. I make $26 an hour and I am just fine with that. They argue that I would be better off if everyone made $40+ an hour. Sure, but if everyone made that, everything under the sun would increase in cost and $40+ an hour would mean nothing. I will also state that I live in Illinois, a pro union and democratic state. As most people know, Illinois is a mess. No money to pay for pensions, no jobs, and the debt grows by more than $1million a day! Why? Take a wild guess. I can’t wait to get out of this state. Thumbs up to Wisconsin and their voters who stood up to the unions. Unions are still mob controlled and politician buying. So, to those who work in the union making more than a decent amount, yes, it is good for you from a wage standpoint, but overall, they are not. They are dying, and let them die. And no, nobody deserves to make $15 an hour working part-time in the fast food industry. Give me a break. If you want to make more, get educated or trained and LOOK for a better job. They are out there, but nothing should be handed to you.

    Reply
  • Jkon
    November 14, 2013, 8:59 pm

    Quality of work union or non-union is a non issue. There are good and bad workers in both. What we need to know is were and how do unions find there workers, who is acceptable and what do others who apply to a union but are not accepted do for a living? It seems anyone can join a union, qualified or not provided they force a non-union shop or workplace into a union. Again who hires the workers not accepted by the union? Were did most of the union employees receive there training, union or non-union? Do union employees hire and support only union companies for there personal projects and repairs or is this to expansive? Are union workers more successful then non-union workers? Should a union worker be allowed to work a non-union job for less money? Should a non-union company be allowed to hire a union worker? What happens when we have more government employees then other workers, were does this funding come from? What happens when North America becomes like the UK or the european union and looses all manufacturing including the auto industry? What happens when one state or province is financially stronger then others, does North America become many small first, second and third world countries? Who hires the people without a trade, should there be a non-trade-union? What future will our children and grand children have if we have no manufacturing jobs, should we have a union for the unemployed? The province of Quebec mostly union, why is there a large underground economy, are they hired by union workers? We worry about global warming, consider our children’s future by keeping the wages reasonable, the manufacturing in North America. Jim V.
    Posted by:
    Jim V.
    October 14, 2010 2:08 PM
    – See more at: http://blogs.voices.com/voxdaily/2006/03/union_vs_nonunion.html#sthash.Voh7CuX8.dpuf
    This is so very well written and you are correct are children will pay for this greed and for those out there that don’t see it we are running out of time to fix it .
    Unions have made the rich man open companies in other countries with less politics. Do you think the rich got rich because they are stupid (A Those Jobs Belong To Us) when the company closes there door did the union help you NO! . Ontario and Michigan are an example of taking advantage of the rich company . GONE FOREVER because unions are money takers not money makers. Only Government can fix this open shop protect the rich get them to open there company’s under protection bring back the jobs are children can not survive without them.
    God help us and bless North America

    Reply
  • Greg
    January 7, 2014, 8:57 pm

    Unlike you union supporters I have been in all facets of the electrical trade from union to non union to union contractor to trying to be non union contractor so I can actually speak about the subject with a little intelligence unlike your greedy selves. For one I would never work for a union contractor again as long as I live. I have never heard so much whining and sniveling from such overpaid, underworked people in my life. Only a few knew the trade like they should have. I grew up on a farm, I know what work is. Second, being a business man and forced to join the union has proved almost impossible to get out even though my employees want nothing to do with it anymore. It is nothing more than a socialist welfare system for the union bosses. What a joke!

    Reply
  • matt
    March 1, 2014, 4:32 pm

    Greg, I’m sure you are very skilled and are definitely a hard worker. Nobody is taking that away from you; but what you have to realize is that when you say you grew up on a farm it almost automatically classifies you in a biased group of anti-union republicans. Guess what? People who grow up on farms aren’t used to sharing are they? When you grow up in a city you learn about the distribution of wealth because where you grew up everybody has to work together and share the resources around us. I work in a HVAC service and installation shop where everybody is from the country. Yes, they do work very hard, but they complain as much as anybody I’ve ever heard. Probably because half of them are over 40 and started when they were 20 and realize that if they would’ve started in the union they could be retiring by now instead of working until they are 60 with knees so shot they can hardly stand… just something to think about.

    Reply
  • mark
    April 12, 2014, 1:08 pm

    On average, union workers are more likely to enjoy better benefits compared to non-union employees. That includes health, retirement accounts, and paid sick leave. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 77 percent of union workers get pensions (guaranteed continued payments) after they retire from the job, compared to only 20 percent of non-union workers.
    I have been in the union trades for 34 years and will retire soon with a earned pension. I nor my wife will ever be a burden on society as we have guaranteed income well above what social security will provide. As for my non union counterparts, most will run out of money before they die and end up on government assistance. I resent the union bashing when so many of the bashers themselves end up this way at my expense. When a union member goes to the hospital, they pay the bill. When a union member retires they maintain a lifestyle above the poverty level and continue to influx money into the economy.
    Twice in my career I watched people join my union just long enough to gain health insurance, have a major operation, then quit, leaving us with the huge medical bills, and increasing our rates.

    Reply
  • Russ
    February 19, 2015, 5:12 pm

    Here’s the difference: If you’re not in a union and you start costing the company more money than you’re making it, you can be fired. If you’re in a union, they will make sure the newest guy (because he pays lower dues) gets fired instead of you. If you’re in a public employee’s union they will make sure you don’t work too hard, because more productive workers means fewer employees and fewer employees means fewer members. The union is in the business of making sure its members stay members. They do not care if they do a good job, they don’t care if anything gets done and they don’t care if younger, better workers get fired, because the younger worker pays lower dues and, in right-to-work states, is far less likely to be a member of the union.
    Unions to want the workplace to be productive, they just want to have as many members as possible so they have as much money and power as they can get.

    Reply