woman-taking-notes.jpgWhen you’re auditioning talent for a voice over job, it helps to take down notes as you’re listening to each demo to remind yourself of why you liked them and what in particular stuck out in the performance.

I’ve been doing a lot of voice casting as of late and have found that those notes aren’t just helpful, they’re a lifesaver!
Learn how to make your own casting notes and also how to tell if you’ve found the right voice by reading this article here at Voices.com.

Did You Get That?

Casting is often a case of “I’ll know it when I’ll hear it,” and that being the case, are you taking any notes when you listen to sample recordings?
Jotting down a sentence or two about why you like someone’s voice or are considering them is integral to remembering why you liked the interpretation and what set it apart.
For the purposes of this article, we’ll be referring to “auditions” (industry jargon for the custom voice samples you receive in response to your posting a job) as “demos” because each submission is a demonstration of what an individual voice over talent can do for you.

Taking Voice Casting Notes:

๏ Allows you to put your feelings into words
๏ Associates specific comments with specific demos
๏ Helps you to narrow your responses
๏ Identifies which read you liked best
๏ Is useful when collaborating with others who are part of the casting process

What Makes a Demo a Contender?

๏ Listening is an enjoyable experience
๏ You listen to the entire demo
๏ You feel happy and the demo gets your adrenaline pumping
๏ The recording leaves you wanting to hear more
๏ The demo is listened to more than twice
๏ It sets a standard or benchmark for all other demos you listen to

Do You Take Voice Casting Notes?

I’d love to hear about your methodologies when it comes to voice casting!
Best wishes,
©iStockphoto.com/René Mansi

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Stephanie Ciccarelli is the Co-Founder and Chief Brand Officer of Voices.com. Classically trained in voice, piano, violin and musical theatre, as well as a respected mentor and industry speaker, Stephanie graduated with a Bachelor of Musical Arts from the Don Wright Faculty of Music at the University of Western Ontario. Possessing a great love for imparting knowledge and empowering others, her blog serves an audience what wants to grow in their careers as professional voice users, and more specifically, voice actors. Stephanie was recently listed on the PROFIT Magazine W100 list three times (2013, 2015 and 2016), a ranking of Canada's top female entrepreneurs, and is the author of Voice Acting for Dummies®.