Reaon Ford

Vancouver, British Columbia, CA • 11:17 PM Local Time

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Reaon Ford

Category Radio
Language English (North American)
Voice Age Middle Aged (35-54)
Description A sample of me wearing my anchorman hat... interviewing (at the time) newly-elected Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau LIVE on Vancouver's only all-news radio station.
Transcript Note: Transcripts are automatically transcribed and may contain errors.
a news 11 30 Exclusive And it is a milestone moment for us here at news 11 30 Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is in Vancouver for the first ministers meeting and for the Globe 2016 environmental conference. He stopped by our studio for an exclusive conversation. Good morning, sir. Good morning. And maybe a milestone for you guys. But I've been back so often here over the years that it feels like coming home for me. Thank you so much. Do we really appreciate your time? We'll get right to it, Mr Prime Minister. One of your big promises during the election campaign with infrastructure spending. This included money for transit here in Vancouver. But with your government now facing a deficit in the tens of billions of dollars oil prices, Aaron, the base mains worries over the world economic economy. How can you make good on that now? Well, the fact is that we saw the challenges coming in the economy for 10 years. We've had less than optimal growth for for Canadians, for Canadian families. And we made a commitment to actually invest in our communities because that's how you create growth. So they downturn in the economy. That means it's even mawr important for us to invest in infrastructure, to lower taxes for the middle class, to give more generous child benefits to the families who need it by not giving them to the family. Who families who don't these kinds of things is what's going to put us on the path to creating the growth that Canadians need. One off the infrastructure issues that has dominated discussion is, of course, pipelines. That is one of the key components, I believe, to getting the economy rolling, pundits have said. Now, just this morning, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall tweeted some in Canada say carbon taxes in the West would gain support for pipelines across the country. How is that working? And he is, of course, referring to Quebec's decision regarding Energy East. So how do you reconcile such different perspectives when it comes to issues like the job of the prime minister's T. Bring people together and to make sure that to the entire country is leaning on each other and supporting each other through difficult things? One of those jobs, other prime ministers to get a resource is to market and responsible and sustainable ways and The way to do that is to make sure you're building public trust in public involvement. For 10 years. We have a government, and that hasn't done a very good job of that on. Therefore, there was a massive amount of opposition and concern around pipelines. We need to create an opportunity to give the public license necessary. And that means working with premieres with very different views right across the country, so that we can grow our economy and smart, sustainable ways for the long term. On that note, you are in town, of course, as we mentioned for the first ministers meeting. So as we know Albert seeing major job losses, Saskatchewan as well it's feeling it. BC seems to be faring relatively well. We know that. So how do you balance the needs of individual provinces? Do current conditions determined priority, or is there more long term planning? Who we are as a country is, ah, were people who help each other out in times of difficulty, You know, the Alberta and Saskatchewan economy have been doing well over the past, while when oil prices were high. Now that they have dropped their facing a real shock in terms of increased unemployment and challenges on, and we're there for each other as a country. So any prime minister needs Teoh balance the ways to best help different regions of the country while making sure that there's growth and opportunities for everyone. And that's where diversifying the economy, investing in infrastructure, investing in innovation and growth and looking at, for example, the challenge of climate change. Yes, as a challenge, but also as an opportunity to create clean technologies and renewable energies and the kinds of jobs we need in the future. You just spoke about helping people out. Obviously, Canada now met its goal of taking in 25,000 Syrian refugees. So not just helping our own citizens but helping others. The issue many of them still being housed in less than ideal conditions, many agencies saying they don't have the resources necessarily to deal with this influx. Did we move too fast? I think one of the things that we have to recognize is is that Canadians have been extraordinary on this. The number of people who have opened up their homes, who've created opportunities in their communities to welcome in these people who are not refugees are not immigrants are now permanent residents is a huge recognition of what makes Canada strong. We have welcomed in successive waves of immigration in fleeing difficult times. That has contributed to the extraordinary success of this country, whether it was Vietnamese boat people or Theis Miley, Muslims from from East Africa. Yes, there are always challenges in this. But for me, we're staying focused on the fact that the goal over the long term over the next five years of the next 10 years over the next generation is that these people be a successful as they possibly can, and getting it right from the beginning is a really important part of that that we're working on. So what's next for Canada in terms of the refugees? Not just the ones who are already here, but for the crisis still happening in Syria? Well, Canada has put in place Ah, very strong whole of government plan to engage in the Middle East with more training, more humanitarian support, more development assistance, more refugees support because we know that there is a needy. We need a multileveled, multi pronged approach to stabilizing the region. There's more we can do here at home will be accepting more refugees. But there's also Ah, lot more will be doing around it, engaging with the world in positive ways because we're talking about 60 million displaced people around the world right now, and that number is only going to start going up over the coming years. So Canada has a level of expertise and ability toe help not just by taking in a few people ourselves, which we will, but by helping other communities and societies around the world. Ah, better deal with an influx of displaced peoples. Now, as we are dealing with our own economic issues here at home, how do you prioritize whether you deal with the problems right here in our own backyard versus MAWR International issues the 11 of the issues I can put forward a zone example that we've worked very, very hard with his our relationship with the United States, which is both very domestic issue and an international issue. And the fact is making sure that we have smooth, smooth border relations, strong economic and cultural and social ties and a good working relationship to deal with of issues that come up whether it's softwood lumber or border access or investments. These are the things that lead directly to better jobs for Canadians, a better, better outcomes, better growth for our business is working on the relationship with the United States as we've been doing hard and as we're going to continue to do with our big meeting in a couple of weeks. Thes air the things that matter on the issue of hot legalization. That was, of course, another a promise key to your campaign. People are still being arrested for possession. So how do you answer to critics who claim this process that simply taking too long on the federal level? Municipal politicians, provincial politicians here in B C certainly have been quite quite so up front about their thoughts on that with the laws haven't changed yet. Pot is still illegal in this country and will be until we bring in a FRAPH strong regulatory framework to legalize control and and make sure that we're keeping it out of the hands of kids on and make sure that we're keeping it from generating tremendous profits for for ah, for criminal organization, street gangs and gun runners. I mean, that's why we committed to legalizing and regulating eso that we are better able to protect minors from the easy access to marijuana they have right now and better able to keep crime from profiting from from from the marijuana industry. That's our focus, and that's what we're going to get right on. And that's that's what is necessary. And we've seen from jurisdictions around the world that have done this in different ways ever been successes and failures. And one of the things that we know we need to do is get it right from the very beginning, and that's exactly what we're going to do. What would you tell someone who's Who's child or teenager presumably has been slapped with some type of of charge related to marijuana when it won't be illegal much longer? I mean, could there not be a period of decriminalization as one of your federal counterparts proposed back during the election campaign? No, I think decriminalization is a bad idea because it doesn't do anything to make it more difficult for young people to access it, and it doesn't do anything in terms of keeping the black market and the criminal organizations from profiting from it. That's why I believe in, AH, control and regulation that actually will do the protection of public safety and end of miners that we need. And in the meantime, it's still illegal. Let's shift gears a bit, Looking at the global perception of Canada, obviously that was a huge thing that changed once you took office. Where is there still work to be done on that front? As far as how Canada is viewed on the world stage? Well, they we've successfully got people to take a pay attention to Canada, and now the next step is ensuring that that leads to more investment in Canada. Greater prosperity, more trade deals that aren't just signed but then acted on and engaged with. And we have, Ah, we have a lot of work still to do on that. But the focus on the international stage is always creating opportunities for Canadians, creating opportunities for growth that's going to help the most vulnerable populations contribute to the global economy and positive ways. We need to engage with the world in a way that's going to create good jobs and positive outcomes for Canadian consumers and Canadian workers on That's the Lens that I put on international engagement a 23 at News 11 30 you are listening to a live exclusive interview with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. For a couple minutes ago, you referenced our relationship with our American cousins. Obviously, it's a big day stateside. Today with Super Tuesday, The Washington Post has dubbed you the anti Trump. How do you maintain that relationship? Should things change in terms of the political landscape stateside? The fact of the matter is, I I look forward to working with whoever gets elected as president. I think there have been times where the president and prime minister have been perhaps misaligned on an ideological or a political spectrum level where we've been able to work very, very well together. And we have to remember that, uh, ideology can't drive our relationship. It has to be pragmatic. Folks focused on the things where we do agree and making sure that we're creating jobs and opportunities for Canadians. So I I will work with whoever gets elected. Even if he doesn't want to work with you. I think understanding the way the American economy works and how much it is. Inter tied with the Canadian economy means that any American president has a tremendous number of issues that they have to get right with Canada and all. I'm what I've said across my my political career is that I'm willing to engage in work constructively on issues that we find of mutual importance and agree to disagree on things we don't don't agree on. But having a positive working relationship with whoever ends up president is going to be really important, not just for me, but for the Canadian economy. On a more personal note, you've had a few months to settle into this into this job. What's been the most challenging part for you on a personal level? Uh, time management. There is so much to do and being able to do it all while still remaining an active and present dad. Ah, and husband is is the balance I need. But it really it helps to remember that I'm not doing this job in spite of the fact that I have a young family. I'm doing it because I have a young family, because I know that the things that were going to be able to do for this country for Canadians is going to lead to a better future for for them and for everyone. As we mentioned, you're here for the first Ministers conference. What's your primary goal? Is there anything tangible you hope will come out of these meetings? Well, I think it's extremely important that we demonstrate Ah riel movement on creating a country in which we see the challenges of climate change as an opportunity for growth, for investment, for shifting the way we work in effective ways to be greener and and mawr environmentally responsible. We have to play our role in the global fight against climate change in meaningful ways. On the way that's done is by proper coordination and collaboration across not just provincial leadership but with municipal leaders. I mean cities have taken great lead on climate change actions and also on national aboriginal organizations who have a tremendous amount to contribute to the discussion around how we're going to create a stronger and cleaner economy. How do you keep everyone happy when you do have such a diverse group of politicians, all with different priorities? You remember that you're all serving the same Canadians that people across the country I know that you can't make a choice anymore between what's good for the economy and what's good for the environment. People understand. We have to do those two together in smart ways. If we're going to create the kind of prosperity and the kind of protected land that and healthy environment that we that we need in the future and that that means remembering beyond the political positioning that various people have. Ah, Canadians need collaboration, leadership and riel action, and that's exactly what we're going to give. Your leadership style is quite a contrast to the previous government. So how do you think that has changed relations with the provinces? Well, I think the fact that we now have relations with the provinces is ah is a good thing. We gather together a first ministers conference back in December in Ottawa that showed a market, uh, positive engagement where nowhere suddenly we all agree on everything and everything's tulips and roses, but very much that we are now open lines of communications. We're now talking regularly when there's issues that come up where we don't see eye to eye, we talk it through. We figure out if there's a way that we can find common ground and agreement. That's the way this country is supposed to work. We have such incredible diversity, geographic and backgrounds and perspectives right across this country that we have to be able to talk with each other, engage and understand that we're all trying to build the same kinds of things with different paths to getting it. And and the prime minister's job is really to pull that together in a in an overarching sense of what it means to be successful in Canada. Now we may be very diverse and very different, but we do share one common concern these days, sir. What do you plan to do about the fact there are no Canadian NHL teams poised to make the playoffs? Yes, my abs air breaking my heart This year, it's Ah, it's it's It's a challenge, but it's one that I know that we are going to rise to all of us collectively. Teoh to turn around in the coming years. Prime Minister, Thank you for joining us. It's always a pleasure. All right. That's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joining us live in Studio