Kim Bretton

LONDON, UK and NASHVILLE, TN, Tennessee, US • 2:08 PM Local Time

5.0 • 62 Reviews
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Kim Bretton

Category Documentaries
Language English (British)
Voice Age Middle Aged (35-54)
Description Audiobook - BESTSELLER
Transcript Note: Transcripts are automatically transcribed and may contain errors.
I found him at the market square, his skin thin like a plastic cloak stuck to his body. He could name cry, too weak, too small, a meaningless spot staggering on the dust for gotten on the outskirts of the city. I couldn't help staring at his impossible eyes. He was a pitiful creature, fading in the abyss. And yet his gaze was powerful and lively. Not the faint look you would expect from a toddler. In that condition, he could barely stand, although he managed to move towards me. Nobody would help him. Nobody would look at him. He was invisible to the eyes of the crowd. Hello? Hello, he answered. I was able to see the full shape of his skull as he approached. His cheeks were sunken in the larger expression of his face and his eyes buried in their sockets, as if consumed from within. A drill of hungry flies was feasting on his left ear on a scab of dry blood hung from it. He crawled more than he walked, dragging his feet around the dusty road. A miserable thread of skin scarcely held his bones together on both his arms and his little long fingers were just thin needles, too weak to move independently. But nothing would prepare me for the vision of his inflated belly. That was hunger made flesh a slow, starving promise of death, waiting for any chance to wipe him from existence. He smiled at me, showing his lazy teeth sticking to his gums. He tried to reach me with his hand. I stepped back instinctively, but then I stood still. He was holding something. A toy, I thought at first, something rounded and shiny, so small it could be hidden. When making a fist for me, I asked. He looked one year old. There was no way he could understand my question, but he surprised me again. Yes, you, he answered. I came closer to inspect what it wass. It didn't look like a toy. I couldn't tell what the object wass or what it was four, but I knew straight away it was something unusual. It consisted of two pieces of shiny metal, one screwed in the other, forming a golden sphere. It looked valuable, not something to be abandoned or left behind. With a rejected child, I hesitated. I didn't see what good I could do by taking the object. However, he looked upset when he saw I didn't take it right away, so I finally held his hand and took the spear.