Randy Hames

Sugar Land, Texas, US • 7:43 PM Local Time

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Randy Hames

Category Audiobooks
Language English (North American)
Description The (Website hidden) retail sample of an audiobook production.
Transcript Note: Transcripts are automatically transcribed and may contain errors.
One thing we're going to have to take into consideration on our way to the future is that a lot of people don't want to go there that way. These people feel that the dedicated Whoopsy Daisy Ecologist and wildlife lover would gladly, at the drop of a buttercup fence you in and 10,000 others like you for the convenience and pleasure of seven moldy bat winged Herren's who might even prefer to be someplace cells. But Mother Nature put them there. The ICO freaks to use their term will say, Mother Nature put me here to without Ask him and you can tell her to put me back. This movement is bigger than you think, and one of its most vociferous spokesman is Richard Neuhaus, who allows that nature is certainly okay in its plays. However, he is the pastor of the Lutheran Church in the heart of Brooklyn, where very little nature seeps in and where there are an awful lot of people, Newhouse wrote in Defense of People. And his point is that we are part of the Biosphere two, and let's not forget it. New House and his ilk rise up in righteous wrath When they hear some heiress in her. Abercrombie and Fitch moccasins say that the national parks air simply being ruined by whom you ask by all those people idea. It used to be, of course, that only her kind of people could get there. But now, my dear, it's simply a swarming mob and all those ghastly trailers. This attitude is known in some circles as the Sierra Club mentality, or keep the wilderness wild by which they mean some feel. Keep it the private preserve of our kind of people and the rest of you. Please leave quietly and pick up those sandwich bags. It goes back, says New House as faras Henry the seventh. My guess is as far back as the pharaohs of Egypt, when wildlife was protected from the people who wanted to eat it. This was to some extent understandable. Since it was all they had to eat, it was protected so that the aristocrats could hunted for sport and eat it, too. Of course, the man traps and the floggings of poachers air pretty rare now, but game is still raised and protected on the vast estates of the ridge, protected, of course, so that it could be shot by the right kind of people, but not shot enough so that it can't be shot again next year. We were just seven guns, old boy, and we shot 478 Brace. Not bad. Odds are pretty good that he is a supporter of the wildlife fund once. Why life for anyway and Renee do. Bo has written that some of us are forgetting that ecology is for people. The ecology of city streets is as important as the ecology of the wilderness Mawr important, say the anti wilderness boys. Now most people are wilderness lovers. That is, they would love to be able to break away more often from that commute and nibble on a bite sized chunk of wilderness. Others dedicated others, not just the ah wilderness. As long as it's mind folks really do care. Let's suppose you're one of them desperately concerned over the fate of the vanishing bat winged heron, and you need the vote of one of Richard Newhouse's Brooklyn neighbors. We're terribly concerned you say about these poor birds. They may die out well, yeah, we wouldn't want that to happen. Ah, what kind of Boyd's the lovely bat winged heron like a duck. Uh, only more so, yes. We think there are only 11 of them left. They're living on this lovely wilderness marsh. Yeah, I went to a wilderness once out of the end of the BMT. And you know what? Coney Island. For this, you would have to go, Father, how you walk if they turn this lovely marsh into a beach? Ah, beach. Yeah. How big it's Ah, mile and 1/2 of coastline for 11 ducks. You can see there's quite a sympathy gap here. Difficult to bridge, even by, say, a $15 book of photographs taken by Prince Phillip, the Duke of Edinburgh, which might be long gone ducks and short on people and not likely to be sold on newsstands in Flatbush.