Medical Voiceover

Job #1630

Job Posting Details

Job # 1630 Medical Voiceover

Posted Date
Jun 5, 2006 @ 17:36
Respond By
Jun 5, 2006
Word Count
0
Budget
$250
Language
English
Gender
Male
Age Range
-
Category
-

Job Description

At Elara Systems, we strive to provide cutting edge solutions for our clients. Multimedia, contrary to popular belief, is not just available to corporations with large budgets. Elara Systems specializes in developing and producing media pieces that astonish their audience, accomplish their goals.

We need the following script read/recorded and posted to a FTP (ours or yours) today (June 5th). Must have excellent pronunciation of medical terminology.

Pronunciation guide:
ISHNE: ish-knee
Brady: same as The Brady bunch

Voice Over:

Saint Jude Medical
QuickOpt™ Timing Cycle Optimization
Part 1 - Introduction to QuickOpt

01:
The management of non-responders to CRT therapy continues to be a challenge to clinical practices today. According to literature, up to 30% of CRT patients fail to respond to CRT therapy. While many factors such as sub-optimal lead placement, lack of LV capture, and improperly programmed delays play a part in the non-response to CRT therapy, there are options available to the clinician to improve response and lower non-responder rates. Eighty-five percent of non-responders in one study were converted by timing cycle optimization.

02:
Dr. Juan Aranda presented this flow chart for the management of non-responders during the ISHNE World-Wide Internet Symposium on Heart Failure in April 2006. Assuming no lack of RV or LV capture and proper device function, optimization of AV, PV, and VV delays is your first line of defense against the management of non-responders.

03:
Traditionally, timing cycle optimizations have been evaluated through the use of echocardiography. Although there are many modes of echo to choose from, such as aortic VTI, M-mode, 2D, 3D, and TDI, all methods require a significant amount of time and resources to perform. In addition to having the proper equipment and an experienced technician to operate it, timing cycle optimization takes 30 minutes for a limited study to more than 2 hours for a more complete study. The burden of echo is the primary reason why timing cycle optimization is generally reserved only for non-responders to CRT therapy.

04:
But there is now a quick and effective way to optimize the timing cycles of CRT patients. Exclusive to St. Jude Medical, the QuickOpt timing cycle optimization algorithm electrically characterizes the conduction properties of the heart and calculates optimal AV, PV, and VV delays at the push of a button.

05:
During any device follow-up, the clinician can simply push a button and in about a minute, the optimal AV, PV, and VV delays are calculated.

06:
The QuickOpt feature can be found on the brady parameters screen. Pressing the QuickOpt Optimization button opens the start test screen where the programmer lists temporary settings that will be used for the series of five tests. The “Start Test” initiates the testing sequence and about a minute later, the results screen appears with the calculated optimal delays.

07:
Each calculated delay may be accepted or rejected simply by pressing the individual check marks, then pressing the “Select Values” button in the lower left hand corner. Pressing the “Done” button returns the user to the brady parameters screen where any values selected will be batch stored. Pressing the blue “Program” button permanently programs those selected values into the device. No more time-consuming echos. No more leaving out those who respond to CRT therapy, since QuickOpt™ Timing Cycle Optimization can be performed on both non-responders AND responders alike.

08:
In summary, the key benefits to QuickOpt Optimization include:
optimizing timing cycles quickly...at the push of a button...reducing the need for echo...allowing optimization of all patients...not just non-responders...allowing frequent optimization in response to changing timing cycles...backward compatibility with all St. Jude Medical multi-chamber ICDs

For a more detailed explanation of the various options QuickOpt™ Timing Cycle Optimization offers as well as how the QuickOpt algorithm works, please continue with the section titled, “How QuickOpt™ Timing Cycle Optimization Works.”


09:
Part 2 – How the QuickOpt™ Feature Works
QuickOpt™ Optimization measurements are based upon the heart’s conduction properties. It is well-known that the atria and ventricles conduct at a speed of approximately ½ meter per second on average. While the impulse slows down through the AV node, it accelerates to a speed of approximately 2 meters per second through the bundle branches and rapidly accelerates again to approximately 4 meters per second in the Purkinje network. However, every patient, especially heart failure patients, conduct at speeds that vary significantly depending on a number of issues such as infarcted areas, ischemia, scarring, areas of slow conduction, or any previous insult to the heart.

10:
The QuickOpt™ algorithm calculates optimal AV, PV, and VV delays based on the hypothesis that mitral valve closure can be estimated by measuring the interatrial conduction time, that onset of isovolumic contraction can be measured using the peak of the R wave, and that interventricular conduction delays can be measured by running simultaneous RV and LV intracardiac electrograms and measuring the time between the peaks of the RV and LV R waves.

11:
With this is mind, the goals are to:
Characterize interatrial conduction patterns so that preload is maximized and ventricular pacing does not occur until after full closure of the mitral valve and;
Characterize intrinsic and paced interventricular conduction patterns so that pacing stimuli and the resultant LV and RV contraction (the paced wavefronts) meet at the ventricular septum

12:
Let’s start with AV optimization. As reported in a study conducted by Dr. Seth Worley and others, measuring the paced and sensed RA-LA activation eliminates the need for echo-based optimization. The QuickOpt algorithm uses the atrial intracardiac electrogram to measure the P-wave duration and calculate the interatrial conduction delay. Depending on the actual length of the RA-LA activation time, a delta is calculated and added to this duration to establish optimal AV and PV delays. The goal of optimizing AV and PV delays is to maximize preload and allow for full valve closure just prior to completion of electrical activity.

13:
VV optimization is calculated based on three measurements; V sense, RV pace and LV pace. The V-sense test measures the intrinsic delay between the right and left ventricles. The RV pace and LV pace tests are then used to compare the difference in conduction speeds. These three tests together characterize inter and intraventricular conduction properties and recommend the optimal VV delay. The goal of VV optimization is to time right and left ventricular activation so that the paced wavefronts meet at the ventricular septum.

14:
VV optimization is calculated based on three measurements; V sense, RV pace and LV pace. The V-sense test measures the intrinsic delay between the right and left ventricles. The RV pace and LV pace tests are then used to compare the difference in conduction speeds. These three tests together characterize inter and intraventricular conduction properties and recommend the optimal VV delay. The goal of VV optimization is to time right and left ventricular activation so that the paced wavefronts meet at the ventricular septum.

Ready to get started?

Join the #1 marketplace for voice-over talent

Need Some Help?
Contact us for help with your voice over project.