Weekly audio needed for podcast - 7 -12 minutes each

Job #6541

Job Posting Details

Job # 6541 Weekly audio needed for podcast - 7 -12 minutes each

Posted Date
Mar 8, 2008 @ 23:15
Respond By
Mar 16, 2008
Word Count
0
Language
English (North American)
Gender
Male
Age Range
-
Category
Podcasting

Job Description

Hello,

I am a new Author of both print and online content in the sales and marketing field. I am looking for a male voice to represent me in audio on a weekly/monthly basis.

My blog is www.gettingthewordout.com/blog . Most likely I will be looking for 1 months worth of Audio in advance. I will be comitting to this for the long term of 1-2 years.

Please quote on 30-45 mins of audio per month or 3-4 total scripts read.

These audio podcast will range from 7 - 12 mins each or 2-5 pages of text. I do not need sound effects through out the entire read. I just want someone to read my written articles/scripts in slightly faster than conversational tone speed.

Best Regards,
Mark

SAMPLE SCRIPT



Hello everyone and thanks for tuning in to my weekly “Getting The Word Out” audio blog cast. Today I will summaries a great book called “Citizen Marketers” on social media. Feel free to email with any questions or comments you might have on this book or topic. My personal email is mark@gettingthewordout.com. Thanks again for tuning in!

What You Will learn from this book:

In this review, you will learn: 1) Who citizen marketers are; 2) How they’re transforming
media, corporations and marketing; and 3) How “social media” will affect you.

Recommendation
Much like the cyberculture events that Ben McConnell and Jackie Huba cherish, their book is fun, jazzy and almost habit-forming. They spin tale after tale of individuals and communities that are doing new and exciting things online, demonstrating just how much the emerging “social media” movement has changed the media landscape. Although fan sites devoted to particular cars or fictional universes are similar to older media phenomena such as fan magazines, spontaneously arising mass movements dedicated to saving discontinued soft drinks or spreading song parodies are unpredictable and unprecedented. The authors do a great job of sketching the outlines of the new movement.

However, in part because the movement is still emerging, and in part because of their genuine enthusiasm for its activities, their analyses aren’t as strong as their descriptions. This is especially true of their discussion of the forces driving social media, which are apparently all positive.

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