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Voice Over • Audiobooks
174

Description

An audiobook demo from 11/3/13. Contains non-fiction and two fiction samples.

Vocal Characteristics

Language

English (North American)

Voice Age

Young Adult (18-35)

Accents

North American

Transcript

Note: Transcripts are generated using speech recognition software and may contain errors.
Rex Anderson. Narrator Your wallet, Pretty boy. He must have been 1/2 foot taller and £80 heavier. But thinking I was Cagney, I punched him in the gut before he had a chance to grab my lapels from behind. The other guy grabbed my hair. I let out a scream that could have been heard in Yonkers. Flash a blade slashed down my left cheek. They took off like lightning. I ran down 83rd Street past Mike the doorman into an empty elevator. The door closed before my eyes in the mirror. Blood gushed like a fire hydrant down my face. My mother took one look at me and screamed, Archie, hurry! She burst into tears. Bobby, Bobby, my poor boy! Pop ran out in his undershirt and shorts. What happened? His face. Ashen. Who did it? Who did it? Cagney would have stayed mum. So did I. Florence, get Dr Anderson. He pulled me into the bathroom, pressing the wound with a towel to make the bleeding stop. Florence, he called out. Don't get Anderson. He'll want to put stitches in. Bobby doesn't need him. Bring me some ice. Pop was right. The bleeding stopped. Thanks to Jimmy Cagney. The thugs didn't get the 75 cents in my pocket. Thanks to Jimmy Cagney. I still have that scar running down my left cheek. As for Dr Anderson stitches, I think I needed them in my head. An excerpt from Stranger in A Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein. Well, boy, what have you learned today? Smith smiled happily, then answered, As always with a pause, I have today learned to do a 1.5 gainer that is a jumping a dive for entering our water by I know, I know. I saw you keep your toes pointed knees straight and feet together. Smith looked unhappy. I rightly did not do. You did it very rightly. For first time watch Dorcus Smith considered this the water Grax Dorcus. It cherishes him. Her door kisses her. Not him. There, Smith corrected, then my speaking was false. I have read in Webster's New International Dictionary of the English language third Edition, published in Springfield, Massachusetts, that the masculine gender includes the female gender in speaking in Haag with slaw of contracts. Fifth Edition, Chicago, Illinois. 1978 On page 1012 it says voted Harshaw said hastily, masculine forms do include the feminine when you're speaking in general, but not when talking about a particular person. Dorcus is always she or her never he or him. I will remember you had better. You may provoke Dorcus and approving just how female she is. An excerpt from Shalimar the Clown by Salman Rusty. The story currently doing the rounds was both military and miraculous. The Indian army had poured military hardware of all kinds into the valley, and scrap metal junk yard sprang up everywhere, scarring the valleys. Pristine beauty, like small mountain range, is made up of malfunctioning truck exhausts, jammed weaponry and broken tank treads. Then, one day by the grace of God, the junk began to stir. It came to life and took on human form. The men who were miraculously born from these rusting war medals who went out into the valley to preach resistance and revenge were saints of an entirely new kind. They were the Iran millas. It was said that if you dare to knock on their bodies, you would hear a hollow metallic ring because they were made of armor. They could not be shot, but they were too heavy to swim, and so if they fell into the water, they would drown there. Breath was hot and smoky, like burning rubber tyres or the excell ations of dragons. They were to be honored, feared and obeyed. That day in Sharm, all bomb bore you numbers. All the vast Awassa was the only man who dared interrupt the medic In preachers tirade. He confronted the strange fact you're in the street and demanded to know his name in business. My name is God's business, the fellow replied. In that first exchange, the newcomer was reluctant to answer to any name at all. Eventually, under pressure from bomb bore, he said. Comibol, Balshaw, Bo Balshaw, as even Bamber knew, was a fabled saint who had come to Kashmir in the 14th century. The time of BB Lalla