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Voice Over • Podcasting
381

Description

This is an emotional human interest story recorded for AJ LongReads, an Al Jazeera Podcast.

Vocal Characteristics

Language

English

Voice Age

Young Adult (18-35)

Accents

India (Hindi), Indian (India)

Transcript

Note: Transcripts are generated using speech recognition software and may contain errors.
Welcome to a J. Long rains, where we bring you the best of Al Jazeera's long form journalism to listen to in your own time. On this Sunday, where in India, where the Corona virus has in one way or another, touched everyone's life, more than 370,000 people have died of Cove in 19. As the country struggles with the second wave of the pandemic. In tales from an Indian crematorium, we hear about one of the hardest jobs going. Written by Saurabh Sharma, Read by me Mo Geeta Nam Sushi Deen Dayal Verma has never burned as many bodies as he has this year. The 55 year old, who has been a crematorium worker for the past six years, says with a wry smile. Actually, no dead body has come today has covered 19 come to an end or other bodies being taken to other crematoriums. Over the last two months, the workload has increased so much that I have now developed a habit of waking up early. Deen Dayal has never been tested for Cove it, nor has he been vaccinated. The Indians 14 year old daughter Sony, says that the family bank in their home village will not allow him to visit for at least four days after cremating a dead body. These days, Sony does her best to care for her younger brothers while her father is working. But it is not easy. One of them, six year old Sonny, fractured his wrist while playing to answer Nature's call. He goes out in the fields and does not use the toilet we have access to. He eats and sleeps outside, and sometimes he gets irritated when he cannot play with my younger brothers. I have seen him cry at night, but he never mentions the reason behind it. We all know that he misses us a lot, and we also miss him. It has been months since we have gone out with him in the evening to the markets to eat, samosa and do grocery shopping. We missed the bedtime storeys about the gods he used to tell us. Back at the family home. His wife and eldest daughter work as domestic help in nearby houses