Sound Stories #023 – The Power of Networking for Creative Careers

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    We’ve all been told about the importance of having an elevator pitch – but actually getting your story straight — the story of who you are, is often easier said than done. If the idea of networking makes your toes curl, this episode is for you. Taylor Shold, Associate Producer at Sportsnet and founder of Shold Media Group shares how you can tell your own story and build your network in a way that’s truly on brand for who you are.

    Shold Media Group: http://www.sholdmediagroup.com/

    TRANSCRIPTION SOUND STORIES #023

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    Hi there, and welcome to another episode of Sound Stories, an inspirational podcast for creative professionals and storytellers who want to improve their lives at home and at work. I’m Stephanie Ciccarelli, your host and co-founder of Voices.com.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    We’ve all been told about the importance of having an elevator pitch, but actually getting your story straight, the story of who you are, is often easier said than done. If the idea of networking makes your toes curl, this episode is for you. Taylor Shold is an associate producer at SportsNet, where he gets to work alongside elite athletes, world-renowned celebrities, as well as a killer production team. However, landing this position was no small feat, and it required Taylor to become an expert networker, even going so far as to start his own company, Shold Media Group, to connect those in media careers. Today, he joins us to discuss how you can tell your own story and build your network in a way that truly is on brand for who you are. Welcome to the show, Taylor.

    Taylor Shold:

    Hey, thanks for having me. I really appreciate it.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    Well, just so pleased to have you here, too. So as a graduate, I think you went to Ryerson, correct me if I’m wrong, you had a dream back in school of building a career in sports broadcasting. So Taylor, how did this pursuit lead you to become an expert in networking?

    Taylor Shold:

    Well, when it comes to the media industry, I think networking is one of the most important things. It’s an incredibly competitive industry, and the thing that often separates people from one another is who they know, and more importantly, who knows them. And when I was at Ryerson, I had a radio show, actually, that we did every single week. And one of the things we did to even just start getting our names out there in the field was to interview current on-air people who were at maybe TSN or at SportsNet, or who did play-by-play for the Maple Leafs, and we would call them up or email them and ask them if they could be on our radio show. And that was the first step into networking, because then you try to get your name out there as much as possible and when you end up graduating, you want to be able to have your name out there. And when people get it in an email, they know who it’s coming from.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    And I love it when you know who something’s coming from. Because as you say, you build up that relationship. People get to know who you are, they see you in different capacities, maybe even different contexts. I know that your company started out of something very interesting. You had been working at the CBC. Why don’t you tell us a bit about that journey and how Should Media Group became what it is today?

    Taylor Shold:

    Yeah. I started interning at CBC at hockey night in Canada in my fourth year at Ryerson, doing the radio and television arts program. And shortly after being an intern, they hired me on a couple of days a week. And then from there I kind of showed I could cut my chops. And from there they hired me three days a week, four days a week, until I was finally hired on staff. But once that happened, we had a changeover in the government and they were cutting a hundred million dollars out of the CBC, and that was a few of my salaries once over. So CBC is unionized, and usually when the last person hired is the first person let go, I knew I was going to be one of those cuts. It didn’t matter based on job performance, or how much potential they may have seen in you, if you were the last person in, you’re the first person out.

    Taylor Shold:

    So I kind of knew the ax was about to fall, and I needed to figure out a way to get my name and my face and what I do out to the industry, because I’d only really met people at CBC. Outside of the people who I’d interviewed on my radio show, I’d only known people working in hockey night and working at CBC sports, which the jobs were quickly shrinking. So I need to branch out and I need to figure out a way where I can cold call people at TSN, at SportsNet, at Global, any other network and say, “Hey, listen, here’s who I am.” But instead of just calling them up and giving them my name and my elevator pitch, as you were mentioning before, I need a reason to talk to them.

    Taylor Shold:

    So I figured if I started my own networking group where I could actually pitch them that I’d be featuring them on this website based on their career, their journey, their advice, and I could pitch that to other people in my shoes, we’re still learning and want to know more about the industry. And that way… People really like talking about themselves and they’re more eager to chat with you if they know it’s going to be outside of the one-on-one realm and be seen by a lot of people. And so from there, I reached out to someone, John Wright from TSN, was one of my first ever interviews. And amazingly, he said yes. So by getting John Wright in the first two months or so of having the site online, it really kind of legitimized it. And when I can tell other people, “Hey, listen, John Wright from TSN,” who’s a huge star, “he talked to me,” then other people were also more willing to do it. And that’s just the power of networking right from the ground up.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    Wow. That’s really impressive. So, Taylor, you had contacts, basically, at hockey night in Canada, people at the CBC. Did you draw on those folks, too, when you were first getting started, or did you just kind of try to branch out and introduce yourself to other people first?

    Taylor Shold:

    No, I definitely used the contacts that I already had, because they knew me. They knew what I was going to be doing was sort of educational and going to be helpful for others. A lot of them were also former RTA grads from Ryerson, so a lot of them were also from the school that I went to. And so that really helped as well, because again, same thing. They were able to put the school’s name forward, and the program that we all graduated from, and it was really cool because they were really, really helpful in getting me off the ground to start with.

    Taylor Shold:

    And then not only that, but they were also helpful getting me freelance jobs, or getting my foot in the door with other networks as well, because the media industry is so small that you know people at other networks even if you don’t realize you do, because you’ve worked with them either in the past, or some of your colleagues have worked with them in the past. And the business itself is just so small that you can’t burn any bridges, and word gets around fast on who’s good and who’s not so good. So you always want to keep on the positive side for sure.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    Awesome. So would you say that networking has changed your life? And if so, how?

    Taylor Shold:

    Oh, it for sure has. I mean, I’ve met so many great people through this networking group that have not only become connections, but they’re actually friends now. It’s not just exchanging business cards and birthday emails. It’s actually getting together, having drinks, talking about the industry, different things like that, which just helps build those relationships even further. And now, because people have realized that I’m a connector, I get to meet so many other people because they know who I can connect them with. So that’s one of the real beneficial parts for me is getting to meet so many great people in the business.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    And I’ve observed your LinkedIn account, obviously on Twitter. You’ve got a lot of people who are involved in what you’re doing, so congratulations on that. I’m a connector too, so everything you’re saying is really relevant to me and it makes a great deal of sense. Just thinking about how networking for some people though isn’t exactly easy. Maybe they feel a little awkward doing it, they’re not sure how much business versus personal information they might share. Give us a little lesson, if you will, on how people can network in a way that makes them feel comfortable?

    Taylor Shold:

    Well, nowadays, I mean, there’s the online portion. That’s how you and I connected, was through LinkedIn. It’s super easy to see someone’s profile and say, “Oh wow, this person and I might either get along or be able to help each other down the road. And a quick, LinkedIn request with a little note saying, “Hey, this is who I am. This is kind of why I want to connect.” That kind of breaks the ice. And if they don’t want to, they just hit ignore, or they clearly just ignore it. And it sort of eliminates that awkwardness of meeting somebody in person for the first time, where it is kind of awkward to call some up out of the blue and cold call them. Or if you’re going to a networking event, going up to them and saying, “Hello,” for the first time.

    Taylor Shold:

    If you are at a networking event, the thing I always say is try to bring a friend, because if you bring someone with you, instantly your guard is down a little bit because you have someone you know, but then if you’re at a networking event as well, everyone else is also there to network. They’re not there just to sit in the corner and sip on a drink by themselves. They’re there to actually meet other people. So as soon as your mindset changes to, “Oh man, am I bothering this person?” To, “Oh, this person is actually here to talk with other people. Now it’s maybe my time to go up to them for the first time and introduce myself.” And as weird as that may sound, just holding something. Having a drink, doesn’t have to be alcoholic. If you want to have a water, a Diet Coke or whatever, just having something in your hand makes you feel more comfortable as well, that you’re not kind of fidgety and not knowing what to do with your hands. And just having that out of your mind, it’ll make you feel more comfortable as well.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    No, that’s a great tip about having something in your hand, because I know that I often talk my hands. Sometimes I need to restrain them a little bit. But having something in your hand can calm you, as you said. Usually it’s a cup of tea in one of my hands or some water, but it gives you something to do. So many of us worry about what to do with our hands and how not to look awkward. I know the kids these days have fidget spinners. I’m not necessarily someone who’s used when, or even making that something I would recommend, but everybody has that insecurity. Just a little physical tension, maybe, and having a way to manage that when you’re already nervous about meeting people is a really great tip.

    Taylor Shold:

    Definitely. And even when you’re meeting someone for coffee. If you just have the cup of coffee on the table and you kind of just wrap your hands around the cup. Even just doing something like that makes things less awkward. The warmth from it makes you feel more comfortable, and it just allows the conversation to flow. And it’s such a small thing, but being comfortable meeting someone for the first time makes them comfortable as well, and then I think the conversations just flow so much smoother when that’s the case.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    No, I agree. And to go back to the whole idea of the elevator pitch, I’m just wondering, since it is kind of one of those cliche, “You need to have one of these, you have to be able to explain who you are and what you do in a very short amount of time.” How can you do that in an authentic way that doesn’t make you feel like you’re selling yourself, or that maybe you’re really self centered? What are some tips that you have for presenting yourself well to somebody when you first meet them, and also how much information is too much information? When should we stop and let the other person begin?

    Taylor Shold:

    Right. So the first thing that I would always do is firm, good handshake. Giving a bad handshake off the hop just almost ruins the experience for me when I’ve met people who give bad handshakes. Eye contact and smiling at the same time really helps just calm everyone down and ease them. And in terms of what you’re actually going to say, you want to be really brief. People don’t know you yet, so they don’t need your whole story. They just kind of need a very brief colenotes. And you don’t want to go on too long, but you also kind of don’t want to just skim over things.

    Taylor Shold:

    So it’s a fine balance, but I find the best thing to do is almost tell a little bit of a story. “I went to Ryerson, I graduated from radio and television. It was a course that I really, really wanted to get into. And then from there I landed at Hockey Night Canada.” And then for me, I’m lucky, because everyone’s like, “Oh, well, Hockey Night Canada? Tell me more.” So it’s easy for me. But if you sell pencils or you sell fidget spinners, it might be not quite the most exciting job where people really want to find out more. You’re just going to have to put your own spin on it to try to figure out, “Well, what can I say to get these people a little bit interested in who I am and what I do?”

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    And you do want to develop a relationship along the way. So I know it can be really hard for people, also, to raise their profile in the industry circles without looking like they’re just someone who’s out for themselves. How was it that you were able to raise your profile? I know you’ve used your own company to do that, but how might someone else do that if they don’t have their own company like you do?

    Taylor Shold:

    I think just leading by example and showing up to work every day and doing a really good job, because the best reference or the best thing to get you your next job is personal recommendations. So after I got let go from CBC, I had a great personal recommendation from guys at the CBC who helped me get in at SportsNet, and SportsNet was only a freelance gig at the time. So then the people who were at SportsNet actually helped me land a full time job at the NHL network. And because the industry is so small, for the media world anyway, everyone had worked together either at the CBC or they worked together at TSN. There’s always connections here or there.

    Taylor Shold:

    And it was because I tried, they could see me busting my butt to get really good work out every single day, but also I was trying to meet as many people as I could because at the time I was freelance. I was working two shifts a week, three shifts a week, picking up whatever you could get. And it was basically the word of mouth from the people within the industry that helped me land each job. And the example of how I got the current job at Rogers, at SportsNet, was because when CBC kind of merged a little bit with Rogers, when they bought the big hockey deal, and the people who I used to work with at Hockey Night, I still had a good impression in their minds because I left on a good note. And then when the people I was working with at the NHL network, they had connections with the boss who was hiring for SportsNet.

    Taylor Shold:

    So it was like a three pronged approach. I’d send in my resume, and then I had people from other walks of life within the industry, telling the guy doing the hiring that, “Hey, Taylor’s not a bad guy to take a look at, because we’ve worked with them at these different places and he’s always been a pretty good employee and a hard worker.” And that personal recommendation, I think, put me over the top in comparison to others. So that was kind of my bullet in the chamber of trying to make sure I can get at the hiring manager from all angles.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    No, that’s an excellent answer. And I’m really glad that you shared about how you went about doing that. From your other work, you mentioned that you did interviews. And I think that that’s a really excellent way to connect with people when you know that you’ve got similar interests, maybe they’re even at a stage in their career where you would personally like to be. Your strategy worked really well for connecting with those like-minded people, but how else might someone be able to find their tribe, if you will?

    Taylor Shold:

    There’s a lot of good resources online. I know LinkedIn is fantastic. There’s 10,000 coffees, where you can actually go on there and see what people are interested in, and it’s more of a professional site than a friend site or a dating site. So it is almost like a dating site, but for people in a professional sense. And even LinkedIn’s like that, too. So I always find going there, make sure your profile is always up to date as much as you can and filled out as much as it can be, because people do actually look at it.

    Taylor Shold:

    Make sure you got a picture that’s not a selfie or a photo of you and somebody else. The photos on those profiles should be really great. And if you don’t have a professional to do it for you, no problem. Go to somewhere that’s got a nice background, either outside or at a nice office building, or somewhere downtown, and get a couple of photos that will take you two seconds to do, but it really helped elevate your profile. So you got to make sure that your stuff is completely filled out and you put your best foot forward and your best image forward.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    Absolutely. So I was just thinking about what you said about the headshots or the avatars that people are using. This may go without saying, but should those photos be the same on all the social networks that someone has profiles on?

    Taylor Shold:

    I think so. I think for me, I have the same photo on Twitter, on Facebook, and on LinkedIn, as well as even Instagram. I just personally like to have the same branding for myself across all the different platforms. And the same goes for username. If you’re on Twitter, if you’re on YouTube, if you’re on Facebook, try to keep your username almost the exact same across all the platforms, because especially if you’re going to be, let’s say, tweeting, but you want to have that go onto Instagram as well and you just do a linked post, if your username’s the same, your tag will copy over and people will be able to click on it and find you much easier than if your tag didn’t actually have the link on it, if it was a different username. And I think the same goes for your photo. Make it easy as possible for everyone to find you and to make sure they know that’s who you are.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    It’s all about building trust, really. And so having that consistency, that kind of cohesiveness across the board, it really does help. And as we were talking about platforms, this question kind of popped in my head, but does the platform that you’re interacting on matter? And what happens if someone isn’t necessarily as advertised, let’s say, in person as they are on social. How does that make you feel as someone who’s being networked with?

    Taylor Shold:

    Well, you definitely feel misled. And I mean, I think you really want to have your photo and your profiles really represent you as accurately as possible. Because the last thing you want to do is get on the wrong foot with somebody who you’re trying to build a personal or professional connection with. If you’re going to need to be doing business with somebody and exchanging actual money, you don’t want to be misrepresenting yourself, and you don’t want to be misrepresented yourself.

    Taylor Shold:

    So make sure everything is accurate as possible, and make sure your profile picture’s updated. If it’s 10 years old and you’ve really changed, maybe it’s time for an update. I know my photo, it’s not from a professional or anything, it’s at a networking event, actually, that I was holding, and the photo that the people were taking was great for me, anyway. And I put it up and now it’s the same photo in all my accounts and I looked the same way I did two years ago when the photo was taken, so I keep it up on all the accounts. And I feel like that’s a true representation of who I am, and I think that people who meet me and who know me would understand and agree with me. And it’s just one of those things that, be as true to yourself as possible, because people really know when you’re being inauthentic. And that’s one of the biggest things to building a proper brand for yourself is by being as authentic to yourself as you can be.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    I love that you said that, because we’ve talked a lot on this podcast about just personal brand story, brand in general, but you need to be consistent and you need to know who you are and to be honest about who you are on all these platforms. I’m really glad that you pointed that out. Now, something that’s really, really neat that I obviously appreciate that you do is that you hold a lot of interviews with many different people varying levels in their career. So what is it that you have learned over this time about being in media from these interviews? Is there anything that’s like a little nugget of wisdom that you yourself have taken from that that you could share with us?

    Taylor Shold:

    Well, it’s not easy. That’s the biggest thing. It’s one of those things where it’s a great job, but there are so many people who want to do it. I work at hockey night, and there were eight of us in total who have the same sort of role. That’s eight people in the whole country who do the opening montages for hockey night or who get the clips or Ron and Dawn, or when Elliott Friedman wants to talk about somebody, we’ll gather all the footage. There’s not a lot of people in the country who do that, so you need to be able to stand out, and you need to really be able to set yourself apart and above the crowd. And one of the best ways to do that is by basically being yourself, but also being someone who was actually pretty talented.

    Taylor Shold:

    It’s not a business where you can coast by. You need to be always coming up with new ideas, with great ideas, that will help build the shows that you’re working on, if you’re working on a particular show. And if you’re working on the news, you want to be able to get the best possible sources, and people, they need to have trust in you. If you’re working in PR, you need to be able to have relationships across many different facets of the industry. Between the corporate clients and the journalists, you might want to get your stories out to even all the way to news sources that maybe want to reach out to you if they have a question or something. So there’s all these different variables. There’s no nugget or secret formula, but by being incredibly authentic to who you are, but making sure that you have a bunch of tools in your toolbox that you can really pull from when any situation arises, that’s a very important thing.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    And this is where that networking skill comes in, because how else would you have made those connections with the different groups of people? Would you consider yourself to be a bit of a social butterfly, Taylor?

    Taylor Shold:

    You know what? Not in my personal life. I pretty much have pretty close group of friends, but professionally, I mix and mingle with people from all walks of life, because I find that incredibly fascinating to meet people who work in hockey, or who work in PR, who are investigative journalists. I love talking about the media. That’s almost become my hobby in itself is just networking and meeting new people within the industry because I find that really, really interesting.

    Taylor Shold:

    But in terms of my actual social life, I’ve made friends through the group, but my actual core group of friends is pretty tight knit, and you can’t be super shy in this business, but you also don’t need to be a social butterfly to be a good networker. You just have to be able to break the ice in conversations with people you don’t really know. You need to be able to kind of put out a good vibe where they don’t feel standoffish by you, or like you’re trying to sell them all the time. You want to be a bit softer in a sense, where I’ve been to networking events where you can tell the person’s just trying to sell you on either themselves or their brand or what they’re doing. And that’s a real put off for me. So if you are able to be a bit soft, you’re going to be a bit more personable, that always goes a long way in my book.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    No, I like what you said, Taylor, about having your friends who you hang out with and likely have known through school and in other ways, and then you have people that you’re involved with in business. And for someone who is a connector like you, it is important to have that core group that you can always go back to and be energized by. So when you’re networking, how do you draw upon, I guess, the energy to do this if it isn’t necessarily something that you would pursue in your personal life?

    Taylor Shold:

    For me, it’s almost like something that you need to do in the media world. It’s pretty much, in my book, networking as part of your job, because sure, part of my job is to make sure that everything I produce for SportsNet and for hockey night is top-notch, A plus, all the time, but having a job and keeping a job in this business is very tough these days with the industry itself getting smaller and smaller and people being laid off here and there.

    Taylor Shold:

    Part of my job, I think, or part of my livelihood, is making sure that I keep my skillset high and my network large enough where they know what I’m doing and what I can do. Because if I get laid off from SportsNet, I need to be able to go somewhere else, and I need to know the people who can help me with that. And through this networking group, part of the whole thing why I started it was for personal reasons. I needed to meet more people in the business. It’s not where do you find the energy? It’s I have to have the energy to do it, because otherwise I don’t think I would be as successful as I actually am.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    Those are great points. It is part of our jobs, really, that you need to get out and meet people who are different from you or people who are similar, others that you can add value to. So if any of our listeners want become the Taylor shold of their industry, let’s say, a connector of people, then how would they go about doing that? How could they be kind of a rising star in their own industry to draw people together to create value the way that you have?

    Taylor Shold:

    The real easy way to do it would just honestly set up industry nights. And they don’t have to be fancy or cost any money. You can basically set up an event on Event Bright, or through your Twitter account, or your Facebook and say, “Hey, anyone who’s interested in the meeting some likeminded people in business or PR, whatever you do, you can set them up and you can talk to a restaurant and say, “Hey, can we bring 20 people out on the Tuesday or Wednesday night when we know you’re going to be slow?” And you know what? They’re going to let you do it for free. They’re not going to charge you for the space because you’re going to bring them people, but it allows you to really sort of be the person that everyone comes to when they come to an event like that.

    Taylor Shold:

    And you’re automatically the connector then, because you’re kind of the nucleus to the group, and by being that nucleus, as soon as someone walks in the door, they’re instantly drawn to you. And then other people realize that, and they see that, and they feed off that, and it almost elevates your own position just by doing a simple little meetup after work for drinks with 10, 15, 20 people. It doesn’t have to be a hundred people, but by doing that and by having these events or by building your brand on social media and having people want to come out and meet you, it really goes a long way in elevating your own status.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    Excellent. I love that. That is something that everyone can do. You can find a group of people or a network, or even a group that you already have online that you’re connected to and just say, “Hey, we’re the local broadcasters in this city and we’re meeting up at this place at this time. Just come casual, say hello.” Sounds like a great evening. You’ve given us a lot of wonderful tips on how to do this properly, this networking thing. But I mean, there’s got to be people who do this not such a wonderful way. Maybe they’re making these mistakes honestly, they just don’t know, talking about faux pas. So Taylor, what sort of things might someone do that they maybe don’t realize aren’t particularly good networking experiences for others that they should curb when they go to network the next time?

    Taylor Shold:

    Well, the number one thing, if you go to a networking event, do not get drunk. You will be so surprised how many people actually have one, two, three, four too many drinks at these networking events and that’s the number one turn off for me is when someone’s completely over the line. And you know what? Have a drink. It’s not bad to go to a networking event and have a beer or a glass of wine or something just to loosen you up just a little bit, but let it end there.

    Taylor Shold:

    The other thing is being so unaware that they don’t realize they’ve been talking about themselves for the last 25 minutes and they haven’t let anyone else get a word in edgewise, and they’ve just been blabbering on about themselves and what they do. You got to be aware that people aren’t there just to hear all about you, that they need to have the conversation and be engaging. That’s another big thing.

    Taylor Shold:

    And then also being someone who can’t take a hint when the conversation is over and monopolizes people’s time. Because if someone goes to a networking event, they’re also there to meet you, but also 25 other people. And if you try to capitalize or monetize their time for 25, 30 minutes, when they really want to sort of bounce around the room, that gives them a bad impression of you as well, because you don’t realize that they’re making you someone who is feeling they’re getting stuck in a corner and you can’t actually go and meet the people you wanted to meet.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    I love those tips. Especially the ones about monopolizing people’s time. That is really hard, because you are there. It’s a networking event. You, you want to meet multiple people, and I know that sometimes people find it hard to warm up to others, and so when they finally find someone they can talk to, it can become difficult to maybe pull yourself away from that conversation because you’re like, “Oh, I’ve got a new friend and this is great.” But we do need to realize that there are ways that people let us know, maybe politely, and for some of us might not be able to pick up on them very well that they are done. What are some of the ways, or the subtle cues, that someone might send another person if they want to end a conversation?

    Taylor Shold:

    I think if you want to end the conversation, it’s always good to almost bring someone else in to kind of break the ice a little bit and break up their constant stream of consciousness. If you say, “Oh, there’s my friend Mike. I’m going to bring him into the conversation. Hey Mike, meet Stephanie.” And then we get a kind of a triangle of a conversation going rather than just a straight line from someone to someone else. Another thing is saying, “Oh, sorry, I need to go refill my drink. Or I just saw someone come in that I need to say hello to.” There’s all these different ways you can kind of get out of the conversation.

    Taylor Shold:

    There are times though where some people they don’t care. They’re just completely there to talk about themselves and to monopolize your time that you honestly have to be a little rude at some point saying, “Hey, great chatting with you, but I have to go and meet some people that are here to chat with me as well or who I wanted to meet as well.” You’re there for yourself. You’re not there for other people. So if you do have to be a little bit rude to someone to say, “I think our time here is up,” and move on, you got to do it sometimes, because you’re there to benefit yourself, not to benefit everyone else.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    It’s not easy to say to someone, “We’re done,” but there are some nice gentle ways that we can do that, and that’s great. And to be able to pick up on those things too is great. Now, I want to make sure that before we go, I give you the opportunity, Taylor, to tell everybody about your website. Especially those in the greater Toronto area. I think that they would really benefit from what you’re doing. Where can they find you online?

    Taylor Shold:

    So online, you can find it that sholdmediagroup.com, and we’re on Twitter under Shold Media group or on Instagram under Shold Media Group on Facebook under Shold Media Group. We’re everywhere online. And it’s basically a website where I’ve compiled a whole bunch of articles that either I’ve written or people who have joined the community have written about the industry, about how they can find jobs, or what advice they might have. There’s people who’ve written blogs about the kind of their story from school into finding new jobs or having to move out West to find a job. I post a lot of profiles on people within the industry as well, where I ask them questions about kind of how networking has helped them, what advice they might have for people who want to get into the industry, how you can stand out.

    Taylor Shold:

    And then I also post jobs on there too, because people a lot of times come to me and say, “Hey, do you mind posting a job, because we know you got a large network of media followers. We want to get it out there.” And that’s not something I charged for. I just do it kind of out of the goodness of my heart to draw more views to the website and get more people following along and join the community. So it’s a real good place to get kind of industry news, what jobs are out there, and to meet really, really cool people within the media industry.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    All right. So one more time that website, I know that people may not know how to spell Shold, so I want to make sure they know it’s S, H, O, L, D. It’s like sold, but with an H, and so just give us that domain name again, if you would, Taylor.

    Taylor Shold:

    It’s shouldmediagroup.com.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    Wonderful. Thank you so much for being on Sound Stories.

    Taylor Shold:

    No, thanks very much for having me. I really appreciate it.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:

    Thank you for tuning in. And if you haven’t already done So I’d like to invite you to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, as well as give us a rating. We love hearing from you in gathering your feedback. Once again, I’m your host, Stephanie Ciccarelli, and I hope you can join us for our next Sound Stories podcast.

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