Deb Munro’s Voice Acting Lesson With Elaine Clark

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    Join Voice Over Expert Debbie Munro as she invites you into a lesson from Voice One’s Elaine Clark, author of “There’s Money Where Your Mouth Is”. Even coaches need to be coached! Listen in on Deb’s lesson with Elaine and get some ideas of your own on how to interpret copy and use your body to better convey the text. Commercial and character reads are featured in this podcast.

    Download Podcast Episode 90 ┬╗

    Tags:

    Debbie Munro, Elaine Clark, There’s Money Where Your Mouth Is, Book, Voice One, Education, Voice Acting, Voice Acting Classes, Voice Acting for Film, Studying, Learning

    Transcript of Deb Munro’s Voice Acting Lesson With Elaine Clark

    [Opening Music]
    Julie-Ann Dean: Welcome to Voiceover Experts brought to you by Voices.com, the number one voiceover marketplace. Voiceover Experts brings you tips, pearls of wisdom and techniques from top instructors, authors and performers in the field of voiceover. Join us each week to discover tricks of the trade that will help you to develop your craft and prosper as a career voiceover talent. It has never been easier to learn, perform, and succeed from the privacy of your own home and your own pace. This is truly an education you won’t find anywhere else.
    Now, for our special guest.
    Debbie Munro: Well, hello Elaine. It’s so nice to have you take some time with me today.
    Elaine Clark: Well, thank you, Deb. It’s a delight to talk to you.
    Debbie Munro: My pleasure. Why don’t you tell us about your company and who you are and your latest book?
    Elaine Clark: Okay. Well, my name is Elaine Clark and I wrote There’s Money Where Your Mouth Is so – was I believe the second voiceover book on the market and it’s a true how-to book on how to become a better voiceover actor and also just a better actor in general. And I have a company called Voice One. I’ve had it for over 20 years and we’re located in San Francisco. I’m also a working actor as well.
    Debbie Munro: Now, I’ve had the pleasure to come and you gave me a studio tour and I’ve got to tell you, honestly I’ve been to a lot of places now and done a little bit of touring and it was just the best set-up ever. I just love what you have going on there.
    Elaine Clark: Thank you. I put everything I love into it. I have a classroom that’s wonderful for teaching people, a recording studio with the most amazing microphone I just bought, a JZ Microphone Black Hole.
    Debbie Munro: It’s a hot mic too.
    Elaine Clark: Yes. Isn’t it? It’s awesome …
    Debbie Munro: I just love the looks of it.
    Elaine Clark: Yes, it’s beautiful, beautiful mic and we have a little theater with 30 seats there so that we can do improv and acting classes. So we do the full gamut in addition to, you know, just basic offices.
    Debbie Munro: Right. And then you cover both the theater film – sorry, I should say both, obviously. You know, a big gamut of the entertainment industry for actors which is fantastic.
    Elaine Clark: You know, I was a theater major in college and what I put in my school is everything that I didn’t learn in college as a theater major. So, like how to make money besides on stage. So, I have everything, you know, voiceover commercial, narration character audio books. We have improvs every Sunday night. We have acting and scene study, classes, on-camera classes, ear prompter, teleprompter, the whole thing so people can do corporate industrials, trade shows.
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: Everything.
    Debbie Munro: What’s really nice too is you gave me your pamphlet and it was just so thorough and I mean, you’ve got the whole year planned ahead which is just fantastic. I mean, it’s just so well-organized and you just have just a big pat on your back. I just think it’s an excellent …
    Elaine Clark: Well, thank you. I used to do them every three months and every time I would hand out the three-month schedule and they say, “Where’s the next one?” I just wanted to [laughs] injure someone. And so I said if I do it by year, then they only just bug me in November.
    Debbie Munro: Well, and when I was reading it over, I just thought to myself, “Oh my gosh, for me to plan that much ahead for that whole year and have that organized before January 1st, have it in the publication, wow.” Just kudos to you, Elaine, seriously. It’s just a great set-up you have and the book is great. I really read through – I read through the whole book. It was fantastic and this is the second edition. Is that correct?
    Elaine Clark: Yes, it is.
    Debbie Munro: Okay, good. And so, the book is entitled There’s Money Where Your Mouth Is.
    Elaine Clark: Right.
    Debbie Munro: And when did you write the original book?
    Elaine Clark: Well, the original, I guess was about 15 years ago.
    Debbie Munro: Wow.
    Elaine Clark: And it was a yellow cover. So, yes.
    Debbie Munro: Fantastic. So it has got a lot of great information and I love all the scripts you have in here. Fantastic exercises.
    Elaine Clark: Oh, thank you.
    Debbie Munro: What I like as well is how you describe what would be ideal for the reads on them, giving them some options and stuff so I think that was a really good choice as well.
    Elaine Clark: Well, good because it’s really about – the words are just 25 percent of an actor’s job. Seventy-five percent is putting your personality into it and interpretation so that people are motivated to take action. That’s our job, for them to get out of their chair, go online, go to a store, pick up the phone, do something in order to take action.
    Debbie Munro: Exactly. And so, that’s pretty much what we’re going to do with me because I love educating so I’m an education addict and I remember I used to hate workshops and think I was too good, I didn’t need education, what the heck. I was a broadcaster. What do I need of it to be trained for? And now that I really understood training and now, implement it myself, I love learning and continually growing so I’m really appreciative for you to take some time with me to teach me and give me some assessments and I’m hoping that other students will benefit by listening to this and also know that even us coaches need training and it’s always good to stay up to date and current with what’s going on in the market.
    Elaine Clark: Absolutely, because we all learn from one another. That’s why I’m really fortunate that in my school, I have so many different instructors that come and teach for me. That’s – that we’re all learning from one another constantly. Absolutely, and what I have is – my basic core curriculum for commercials is based on four concepts, technique which is very heavy in the book There’s Money Where Your Mouth Is. It’s subtext which I use in the making at [Indiscernible] section using motivation, intention, needs and emotion and styles. We have the various styles of commercials and industrials and everything else that’s out there and spontaneity so that you trust your self enough to add additional things to it. It sounds like you’re just talking rather than reading so it’s about lifting the words off the page. That’s all of our jobs.
    Debbie Munro: Absolutely. Well, I’m hoping we can work on – I’ve got Jiffy Light Dinners in front of me here.
    Elaine Clark: Okay.
    Debbie Munro: So maybe we’ll start with that one. I feel like I’m in touch with my acting skills.
    Elaine Clark: Okay.
    Debbie Munro: And I think I do know how to make things without sounding like I’m reading. You know, I’m at that point, thank goodness, or I shouldn’t be teaching. But I’m also hearing some comments lately that – now, I don’t know if it’s just fuzzy direction or if it’s maybe something I’m doing now I’m not aware of but they’re saying that even though it sounds conversational, there’s still some effect in the voice. Now, that could have been just for that particular spots or, you know, their direction which is a little absurd to me at the time but I just thought we’d address maybe that and see if you hear anything like that in me or any kind of direction of course you can give me after I’ve done my read-through.
    Elaine Clark: Well, there’s one thing just to be aware of and I haven’t heard you read this yet but a lot of times when people get really good at their craft, it can become flick.
    Debbie Munro: Yes.
    Elaine Clark: Because you know what you need to do and now, we still have to put some of those rough edges on there that sometimes a newbie who’s starting in the business has.
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: And that we have to go back and sort of – and find that freshness, that new look, that new approach.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: So, let’s just see what you have going on. So, I’ll just listen to you for a while and I’ll make some comments.
    Debbie Munro: Okay, sounds great. I knew when I had three kids, I was going to be busy but not this busy. With Ronnie on the baseball team and Susan taking ballet class and Aaron is in the school band, there’s never a dull moment. Between working and running mom’s shuttle service, I’m often left with little or no time to cook. Thank goodness for Jiffy Light Dinners. I just pop them in the microwave and in less than 10 minutes, it’s dinner time. Jiffy Light Dinners, they’re they easiest part of my day.
    Elaine Clark: Good. I think, you know, initially, I would say, you know, it’s a fabulous read. It’s really nice. What – I mean, you’re in touch with the kids. I had a feeling that you knew who they were rather than you just sort of – or saying people’s names. What – where it starts getting a little bit advertisey is when we start bringing in the product.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Because people don’t talk this way. You know, thank goodness I have Jiffy Light Dinners.
    Debbie Munro: Yes, of course.
    Elaine Clark: So, that’s where I would – we just need a little bit more story there.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Like what happened when you said, “I often have little time to cook”? Can you give me the – like in using substitution, what exactly happened at that point in your story?
    Debbie Munro: Oh, for me at the time, I was actually just going to grab the Kraft Dinner because I’ve just run out of time to cook the actual authentic meals and so – or Jiffy Light in this case. My bad. For me, in my head, I was just grabbing the Kraft in the box [laughs] so for me, I was grabbing the box but then it’s like – and I look at it and it’s just like, “Oh, thank goodness for Jiffy Light because I just couldn’t do it without this.”
    Elaine Clark: Yes. And what I would do is don’t even put the box in it, in your mind.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Because that’s what – because it’s already written into the script.
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: Instead, what I want to have a feeling is that this is the only 10 minutes of your day when you get to do nothing.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: So …
    Debbie Munro: This is the relaxing point.
    Elaine Clark: Yes, that you get to for 10 minutes just [Indiscernible] [0:08:30] of food and sit back and put your feet up. So if I go, “I often have little time to cook. Oh, thank goodness,” now you can put your feet up and relax with Jiffy Light Dinners.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: You just pop them in and that’s – and so now, if you’re talking to somebody because everything is a conversation, so I might be your neighbor who comes over and says, “Deb, how come your feet are up and you have three kids? How do you do this?”
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: And then this is your answer to it.
    Debbie Munro: Yes.
    Elaine Clark: Please go ahead and read.
    Debbie Munro: I totally got you there. Okay. And do you want me to do it from the top or take it from the …
    Elaine Clark: Yes, from the top …
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Yes. Just like I said, “Wow, how come your feet are up when you got three kids to feed?”
    Debbie Munro: Oh, well, I knew when I had three kids, I was going to be busy but not this busy. I mean, with Ronnie on the baseball team and Suzy’s taking ballet class and Aaron in the school band, there’s never a dull moment. Between cooking and running mom’s shuttle service, I’m often left with little or no time to cook. Thank goodness for Jiffy Light Dinners. You know, I just pop them in the microwave and in less than 10 minutes, it’s dinner time. Jiffy Light Dinners, they’re the easiest part of my day.
    Elaine Clark: Good, good. So, what I – that was also a very nice read so what we’re talking about now is just like little tiny percentages of the read rather than you need to improve 90 percent.
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: We’re talking about …
    Debbie Munro: Fine tuning.
    Elaine Clark: … three to five percent.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: So, it’s very small. We have – what I want to hear is like even starting a little sooner, “between working and running mom’s shuttle service”.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: So I want to be able to have a feeling of like the guy with – the kid with the tuba. You had to drive home. You know, it’s just like, oh, and then …
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: … how it broke on the way out of the car.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: When you say, “I’m left with little time to cook,” because now you got to go in – go to the repair shop.
    Debbie Munro: Okay, got you.
    Elaine Clark: Maybe even use – maybe even laugh and, “Thank goodness there’s Jiffy Light Dinners.”
    Debbie Munro: Yes.
    Elaine Clark: Rather than a, “Thank goodness,” because I don’t hear it rescuing you.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: So the other part of the day is exhausting. This is the part that’s not exhausting.
    Debbie Munro: Okay. Here’s a relief. Yes.
    Elaine Clark: Yes.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: So I want you to try it again from the top.
    Debbie Munro: Okay got you there. Sure. You know, I knew when I had three kids, I was going to be busy but not this busy. I mean, with Ronnie on the baseball team and Susan taking ballet class and Aaron in the school band, there’s never a dull moment. Between working and running mom’s shuttle service, it’s often left with little or no time to cook. Thank goodness for Jiffy Light Dinners. You know, I just pop them in the microwave and in less than 10 minutes, it’s dinner time. Jiffy Light Dinners, they’re the easiest part of my day.
    Elaine Clark: That was nice, really nice.
    Debbie Munro: Great.
    Elaine Clark: Really nice because then it’s giving me advice rather than I’m just sitting there feeling sorry for you because you have a busy lifestyle.
    Debbie Munro: Totally got you there.
    Elaine Clark: Yes.
    Debbie Munro: It showed a little stress where the relief comes in.
    Elaine Clark: Right. So I would like to – it’s part of – you know, we all know about the art [Phonetic] [0:11:17] of a character so it goes from the art [Phonetic] of, “Oh, I just can’t handle this anymore and those silly children of mine too. Well, now I have a little bit of time to myself and now, I’m happy.”
    Debbie Munro: Yes, exactly.
    Elaine Clark: And I could be happy. Yes, so I think the – it’s very typical. The more you add product in it and spots, you know, product references and, you know, key points that we have to make, the more advertisey we can sound and that’s the biggest challenge that we have.
    Debbie Munro: Yes, of course.
    Elaine Clark: So, how to put – well, I like to call it putting in more history.
    Debbie Munro: Yes, absolutely, the back story or the intention. Okay. Well, why don’t we end with maybe Talking Teddy?
    Elaine Clark: Okay, perfect.
    Debbie Munro: Hello boys and girls. I’m new Talking Teddy. Spather [Phonetic] [0:12:00] Corporation made me just for you. How about that? Listen to this. I laugh. I cry. I wear a diaper, uh-oh. But most of all, I hug people. I love you. I wish you would take me home with you. Talking Teddy and you can be great friends.
    Elaine Clark: Great. So, very nice, very cute. You know, one of the issues with trying to do character stuff especially a younger child is thinking like an adult by doing the voice of a younger child.
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: So there are a couple like syllables just like three syllables throughout the whole thing that gave away that you were an adult. And you had a laugh that you kind of commented on your self that I don’t think the kid would do.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: So, maybe – like the diaper, “Uh-oh,” and you kind of laughed.
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: Well, the kid doesn’t know …
    Debbie Munro: Yes, that’s the …
    Elaine Clark: … with that.
    Debbie Munro: Yes, absolutely.
    Elaine Clark: So, and you can also – kid’s stuff, you might even make L’s, W’s like I ‘wove’ you.
    Debbie Munro: I ‘wove’ you. Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Yes. But they’re not – but don’t try to make it too much because they just can’t form their mouth that way.
    Debbie Munro: Got you.
    Elaine Clark: When – facially, what are you doing with your face when you make the character?
    Debbie Munro: I’ve got a little bit of an overbite.
    Elaine Clark: Oh, okay.
    Debbie Munro: Hang on. Oh, hey. It’s a lot of bottom jaw work. And my top lip kind of stays a little pouty.
    Elaine Clark: Okay. And what are your eyes doing?
    Debbie Munro: They’re real big.
    Elaine Clark: Oh, good, excellent. So, now I want you also to – and to sort of look up because one of the things about being a child is that everyone is taller than you.
    Debbie Munro: That’s a really good point.
    Elaine Clark: So go ahead and look up and just go, “Well, hello boys and girls.”
    Debbie Munro: Hello boys and girls.
    Elaine Clark: Good, and giggle and – and then just also they’re really – they are so proud of themselves.
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: You know, I’m new Talking Teddy.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Wow, I can’t believe I did that. So …
    Debbie Munro: [laughs] It was great.
    Elaine Clark: So, just – and when you do the diaper “uh-oh”, you might be sitting right now but either pinch your cheeks, the bottom ones.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Or grab a hold of your backside.
    Debbie Munro: Yes, usually I lift up my bum and hold like it’s poopy in there.
    Elaine Clark: Okay, exactly. Oh.
    Debbie Munro: Okay. Oh, hello boys and girls. Oh, I’m Talking Teddy. Spather [Phonetic] [0:14:35] Corporation made me just for you. How about that? Listen to this. I laugh. I cry. I wear a diaper, uh-oh. But most of all, I hug people. I love you. I wish you would take me home with you. Talking Teddy and you can be great friends.
    Elaine Clark: You make it ‘gweat’.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Talking Teddy.
    Debbie Munro: Talking Teddy and you can be ‘gweat’ friends.
    Elaine Clark: ‘Gweat’ friends!
    Debbie Munro: Can be ‘gweat’ friends!
    Elaine Clark: Yes. So they also have a little more ups and downs in their voices.
    Debbie Munro: Yes, that’s a good point.
    Elaine Clark: So, that will give it more clarity because that’s the trouble. Now, where you have this – you have all those impediments that you created …
    Debbie Munro: Yes, I know and then [Indiscernible] [0:15:30].
    Elaine Clark: Yes, which are fabulous. I mean, that’s a – because you have a nice voice with that. Now, we have a couple of things that we can add to it. Where are the kids in relationship to you? So you create a 3D effect. Are they close or are they far away?
    Debbie Munro: Yes, they’re close.
    Elaine Clark: Are they just sitting …
    Debbie Munro: … far away, yes …
    [Crosstalk] [0:15:49]
    Elaine Clark: “Hello boys and girls”, like you’re far away or, “Hello boys and girls.”
    Debbie Munro: Yes, that’s a good point, yes.
    Elaine Clark: Or maybe just to show us variety, you could have the boys far away and the girls close.
    Debbie Munro: That’s a great idea. I think I’ll do that one.
    Elaine Clark: And I also – the thing is at an audition, it’s different from at a job. So, at an audition you got to throw in the kitchen sink.
    Debbie Munro: Yes.
    Elaine Clark: At the job, they may take out a faucet or something [laughs].
    Debbie Munro: That’s very well put because that’s so true because, the audition, you got to give them such a journey but yet, in the actual job, they may not want that much of a journey in that short of a dialogue piece.
    Elaine Clark: Yes, they just want to see that you’re directable and that you have good ideas and you got to beat out everybody else.
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: So, the other things I like to hit are new, free and improved. I’m new Talking Teddy. I don’t know what happened to the old one.
    Debbie Munro: I’m new – okay, got you.
    Elaine Clark: Yes, so push that out. And then when you have something like a – when you say, “Listen to this,” kids are – you know, do 180s all the time.
    Debbie Munro: Yes.
    Elaine Clark: So, when you have, “How about that?” And then, “Oh, oh, listen to this.”
    Debbie Munro: Yes, of course.
    Elaine Clark: You know, do something that you’re just – or surprised.
    Debbie Munro: Yes. We could be great friends. Hello boys and girls. I’m new Talking – oh, hang on. Hello boys and girls, I’m new Talking Teddy. Stather [Phonetic] [0:17:05] Corporation made me just for you. How about that? Listen to this, I laugh. I cry. I wear a diaper, uh-oh. But most of all, I hug people. I love you. I wish you would take me home with you. Talking Teddy and you can be great friends.
    Elaine Clark: Great, great, very nice. Now, this is once again a technical advice if we’re at the job. So, everything is lovely. Since we have that one specific set place where it says, “I laugh,” and it says giggle …
    Debbie Munro: Yes.
    Elaine Clark: … I would save the laugh for two places. One, after it says, “I laugh,” and then you giggle and the other one, “Can be great friends,” at the very end, laugh again.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: If you’re going to throw in another one, do it after, “Hello boys and girls.”
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: But don’t do it after – between Talking Teddy and Spather [Phonetic] [0:18:08] Corporation because that would – that will detract a little bit from the name of what we need to buy.
    Debbie Munro: Got you. I’m leading it in and – oh, okay, got you and I’m also leading it in too much. Right? It becomes almost a permanent quirk to the character, the laughing at everything.
    Elaine Clark: Yes. We want to really just sprinkle it in exactly where we want it.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Because it still has to be a clean read and some of the laughs I felt were comments from an adult.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Going could you [Indiscernible] [0:18:36] your self?
    Debbie Munro: Got you.
    Elaine Clark: [laughs] You know, so rather than the kid really laughing that way …
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: So let’s try it.
    Debbie Munro: I think I got you there. Okay. Oh, hello boys and girls. Oh, I’m new Talking Teddy. Hang on, I’m going to go again.
    Elaine Clark: Okay.
    Debbie Munro: Hello boys and girls. I’m new Talking Teddy and Spather [Phonetic] [0:19:00] Corporation made me just for you. How about that? Listen to this. I laugh. I cry. I wear a diaper, uh-oh. But most of all, I hug people. I love you. I wish you would take me home with you. Talking Teddy and you can be great friends.
    Elaine Clark: Great. Very nice, very nice.
    Debbie Munro: I think I don’t even know where the laughs [Phonetic] [0:19:34] went in there but I think I avoided some of the …
    Elaine Clark: Yes, that’s okay. Yes, but it’s just starting to get cleaner.
    Debbie Munro: Yes, got you.
    Elaine Clark: Cleaner. So, one of the things I like to do with kid stuff is really push the you, “Made me just for you.”
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: How about that?
    Debbie Munro: That makes sense.
    Elaine Clark: How about that? Yes, because, “How about that?” isn’t that important. There’s, “Oh, listen to this.” You know, then you have the other parts.
    Debbie Munro: [Indiscernible] [0:19:56] which really sucks …
    [Crosstalk] [0:19:57]
    Debbie Munro: I can still make this work. I’m a [Indiscernible and I …
    Elaine Clark: Yes, but – so here it is. I’m throwing out a whole bunch of directions and I’m sure you’re going to take it all. So that’s also [Inaudible].
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Have some pressure now.
    Debbie Munro: No – yes, I was going to say, “Okay, that’s too much pressure now.” [laughs] Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Yes.
    Debbie Munro: Oh, hello boys and girls. I’m new Talking Teddy. Stather [Phonetic] [0:20:21] Corporation – I’m going to try again.
    Elaine Clark: Okay.
    Debbie Munro: Oh, hello boys and girls. I’m new Talking Teddy. Stather [Phonetic] [0:20:30] Corporation made me just for you. How about that? Listen to this. I laugh. I cry. I wear a diaper, uh-oh. Oh, but most of all I hug people. I love you. I wish you would take me home with you. Talking Teddy and you can be great friends.
    Elaine Clark: Great, great. I just want you to do one line again.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: And that’s the line, “I wish you would take me home with you.”
    Debbie Munro: Yes.
    Elaine Clark: Because that’s the action line.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: So that’s where people go – buy it and take it off the shelf. I wish you would take me home with you.
    Debbie Munro: Okay.
    Elaine Clark: Like, “Really, help me out here.”
    Debbie Munro: That’s where you can do in the heartstrings a little bit.
    Elaine Clark: Oh, yes.
    Debbie Munro: Yes, I got you. Okay. I got you, totally.
    Elaine Clark: So just do those last two lines.
    Debbie Munro: Okay. I wish you would take me home with you. Talking Teddy and you can be great friends.
    Elaine Clark: Good, and go ‘fwiends’.
    Debbie Munro: Can be great ‘fwiends’.
    Elaine Clark: Go ‘fwiends’!
    Debbie Munro: Can be great ‘fwiends’!
    Elaine Clark: Good. [laughs] That’s nice because it has a slightly different rhythm to it.
    Debbie Munro: Of course.
    Elaine Clark: And that’s what makes kids say stuff. Sometimes, they just can’t form the words in their mouth.
    Debbie Munro: Yes.
    Elaine Clark: They go through all sorts of incantations …
    Debbie Munro: Right.
    Elaine Clark: … to get it out. When it starts sounding odd in our ears when we’re doing character stuff, that’s usually when it’s working.
    Debbie Munro: And isn’t that the truth when you’re uncomfortable, you’re learning the most. Right?
    Elaine Clark: Yes.
    Debbie Munro: So true. Well, that was awesome. Thanks, Elaine. That was great.
    Elaine Clark: Well, thank you. That was fun.
    Debbie Munro: That was a great session for me. I appreciated that very much.
    Elaine Clark: Oh, good. Now, you have to tell me how many jobs you booked.
    Debbie Munro: Okay, will do that for sure. Now, what I would like to do is just wrap up with letting everybody know first of all, you’re going to be available to us when we stop in San Francisco on our cruise. Aren’t you?
    Elaine Clark: Yes, absolutely.
    Debbie Munro: I’m so excited about that. So, we’re going to set up something with you then on the day at San Francisco and we’ll send out more details on that as we go but this is a great opportunity for everybody to see how gifted you really are and …
    Elaine Clark: Oh, thank you.
    Debbie Munro: … to hear what you transferred [Phonetic] [0:22:39] for me, that was great. Thank you. I can’t wait to listen back to it. Now, again, the book is …
    Elaine Clark: There’s Money Where Your Mouth Is.
    Debbie Munro: And they can order it where?
    Elaine Clark: They can order it through Amazon.com.
    Debbie Munro: Excellent. Good. And so, your company is Voice One so VoiceOne.com, number …
    Elaine Clark: Well, actually, we’re at VoiceOneOnline.com. It’s a little bit long but they can get it.
    Debbie Munro: Yes, it’s okay. That’s perfect, worth checking out. So, I hope everybody does. Thank you so much, Elaine. This is fantastic.
    Elaine Clark: Well, thank you.
    Debbie Munro: I really appreciated that. And we’ll be in touch real soon either way.
    Elaine Clark: Perfect.
    Debbie Munro: Okay. Thanks again.
    Elaine Clark: Talk to you later.
    Debbie Munro: Take care. Have a great, good Friday.
    Elaine Clark: Okay, you too.
    Debbie Munro: Bye-bye.
    Elaine Clark: Bye-bye.
    Julie-Ann Dean: Thank you for joining us. To learn more about the special guest featured in this Voices.com podcast, visit the Voiceover Experts show notes at Podcasts.Voices.com/VoiceoverExperts. Remember to stay subscribed.
    If you’re a first time listener, you can subscribe for free to this podcast in the Apple iTunes Podcast Directory or by visiting Podcasts.Voices.com. To start your voiceover career online, go to Voices.com and register for a voice talent membership today.
    [Closing Music]
    Julie-Ann Dean: This has been a Voices.com production.

    Links from today’s show:

    Voice One
    Elaine Clark
    Debbie Munro
    Debbie Munro’s Voices.com Website

    Your Instructors this week:

    Voice Over Expert Debbie Munro
    Debbie MunroBy employing over a dozen years wisdom in voicing and acting, Debbie Munro puts her talents to work to meet the challenging demands of today’s fast paced voice market. Tired of not receiving constructive feed back on how to improve her craft, Debbie set out to make a difference for actors by creating, The MIC & ME Workshop Series. Keeping focused on the Global Freelance market, Debbie has combined her extensive Voice Over, Acting and Off Camera training into a series of practical, exciting workshops that will take you to that next step, no matter what your level.
    Fueled by experience, talent, and unbridled enthusiasm for doing what she loves to do best – getting behind a microphone and speaking her heart out, Debbie is proud to share her insights, techniques and secrets with you. She works very hard to create courses that shed an honest look into the world of voice acting allowing you to work at your own pace, know if this is the industry for you and how to keep working. Her passion alone will engage you and give you the encouragement you need.
    Voice Over Expert Elaine Clark
    Elaine ClarkElaine Clark began her voice-over career in the early 1980s. She is an award winning actor, director, producer, playwright and the author of the quintessential voice-over book, There’s Money Where Your Mouth Is. Her first voice-over job was for Wendy’s “guess how many corners to a square hamburger” campaign. Since then Ms. Clark has voiced hundreds of commercials including Clorox, TiVo, Macy’s, Chevron, PineSol, PG&E, California Milk Advisory Board, Quaker Chewy Granola Bars, Manwich, Fuller-O’Brien Paint, World Savings, Wheel Works, Amazon.com, Round Table Pizza, Tap Plastics, Party America, and promos for ABC. A few of her narration clients include Microsoft, Genentech, Oracle, WalMart, North Face, Kaiser Permanente, Better Homes Realty, NIC, Providian, Fujitsu, and L’Oreal.
    The owner/founder of VOICE ONE in San Francisco, Elaine Clark and her staff of professionals train actors in voice-over, on-camera, acting, and improv. Ms. Clark has numerous directing and casting credits including two anime cartoon series, JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure and Saikano; over 50 video games including Spawn, Aliens, Skies of Arcadia, D2, Mother Goose’s Farm, and Dark Wizard; and hundreds of toys. She is featured in the DVD Hello Anime!
    Ms. Clark travels the world teaching and directing voice-over, acting, and communication. Recently, she was dubbed the Communication Guru of India.

    Did you enjoy Debbie and Elaine’s episode? Leave a comment with your thoughts!

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    Stephanie Ciccarelli is the Co-Founder and Chief Brand Officer of Voices.com. Classically trained in voice, piano, violin and musical theatre, as well as a respected mentor and industry speaker, Stephanie graduated with a Bachelor of Musical Arts from the Don Wright Faculty of Music at the University of Western Ontario. Possessing a great love for imparting knowledge and empowering others, her podcast Sound Stories serves an audience that wants to achieve excellence in storytelling. Stephanie is found on the PROFIT Magazine W100 list three times (2013, 2015 and 2016), a ranking of Canada's top female entrepreneurs, and is the author of Voice Acting for Dummies®.

    4 COMMENTS

    1. It was really great to be “a fly on the wall” and listen in on this coaching session. Great stuff. I’m reading Elaine’s book again and refreshing myself on copy interpretation.
      Thanks for posting!
      Alex

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