Podcasts Vox Talk Improving Your Skin When Auditioning for On-Camera Roles with Rakhi Roy
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Improving Your Skin When Auditioning for On-Camera Roles with Rakhi Roy

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Stephanie Ciccarelli
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Do you struggle with acne, rosacea or eczema? Does your skin flare up when you’re stressed or before an important audition or performance? Actress turned Registered Dietitian Rakhi Roy shares her journey with eczema and how taking care of what’s inside your body can make a big difference when recovering from external skin issues. Discover how important digestion is to your skin health and ways you can improve the appearance of your skin.

Mentioned on the show:

Rakhi Roy, Registered Dietitian

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Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Hi there and welcome to Vox Talk, your weekly review from the world of voice over. I'm your host, Stephanie Ciccarelli from Voices. Do you have any skin issues? Maybe something that keeps you from auditioning or going out? Because it's just you don't know what to do. Well, on today's show, we have an actress turned dietitian, Rakhi Roy, on to join us to share all about how you can take better care of your skin and also how to get to the root cause of why you might be having breakouts or flares that really get in the way of your acting and your voiceover business. Without further ado, Rakhi, welcome to the show.

Rakhi Roy:

Thank you, Stephanie, for having me.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Yes, Rakhi, I first found you on Instagram, and that was really neat. You have a great presence there, by the way, but I just think it's so wonderful that you're here with us, and we're really looking forward to hearing your story. So, as I was saying a bit earlier in our intro, you have an acting background, and at some point you decided to go down the nutrition route. And we're just wondering what's your story and how did you go from being an actress to a registered dietitian who works specifically with Gut Skin Health?

Rakhi Roy:

Yes, I'll give you the abbreviated story. Right. I always grew up with skin issues. I’ve had eczema since I was six months old, and I always had a battle, self esteem issues with my skin, and that did not help the situation if you are working towards an acting career. I studied theater in undergrad, and then I was making transition into TV and film into my early twenties, and that's where all of the skin problems surfaced because everyone was shooting in HD, and you can pick apart, as any kind of actor or artist does, the way they look. And I said, oh, no, this is not going to work. I'm not going to book any work if my skin’s flaring. So I found a functional registered dietitian who took an approach with helping anyone who has allergies, eczema, and that really changed the game for me. I started kind of blogging my journey about, back when Instagram was starting and everyone was posting food pictures. I just started to post about my nutrition and what I was doing, and my skin actually was starting to show the biggest turnaround, something that I didn't see when I was going to my dermatologist or even my allergies. They were not really able to pinpoint so much what was causing my flares. And so I was like, this needs to be put out into the world. I need to help others who are struggling with this, because I just felt like there was a gap in the field and I still wanted to pursue my acting career, but I knew for me, I wanted to also support myself as a working actor. Right. I knew maybe working in food industry wasn't going to be the best for my energy levels or even my skin, because stress definitely flares my skin. I'm sure some members of your audience could say the same. Stress definitely tends to bring out the worst in our skin. So I said, you know, maybe I could do both. Maybe I could get my degree. So I pursued my masters in nutrition. I went through the full match process, 1200 clinical hours to become an RD. And here I am now, years later. This has almost been ten years in the making where I have kind of shifted into a gut centered approach and I help people kind of support their skin from within. And I do actually have quite a few actors that I work with, and it's really great that I can tie both passions together.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

I love it. I absolutely agree, to be able to take two great things in life that you're super passionate about and bring them together and make an income really also doing that, is quite fulfilling, but also, I would say, is probably goals for someone out there who's really like, ‘How can I do this and this and still make it all work?’ So thank you for sharing that, Rakhi. And one of the reasons exactly, one of the reasons why we're talking today is because many actors do struggle with their skin. And as you had said earlier, you had a struggle with eczema. And, you know, someone else might have rosacea or acne or something else. Something else that is affecting them and their ability to be seen or to want to be seen. So, as you know, this will keep people away from going to auditions or submitting a self tape or doing anything that might require having to show their skin in the state that it's in at that time. And of course, that's discouraging when you miss out on roles. You're not just missing out on like, ‘oh, I could be doing this.’ It's like you actually lose income too, right? Like, as a working actor, if that's how you're making money, then you don't want to have less auditions or that sort of thing. So how do you know, Rakhi, if what you're going through is temporary and will heal on its own versus something that needs to be looked at by either a doctor or with someone who focuses on gut health.

Rakhi Roy:

So that is going to take a lot of maybe investigation. For most people, they're maybe not well equipped with the knowledge of what's going on with their skin. I say less is more. A lot of times, if you're doing something on your own, just be careful about the unsolicited advice you get from Google. It can make matters worse. I usually like to say be very simple with your skincare routine and diversify your diet. What I see mostly what people are doing is the opposite. They tend to eliminate a lot of things in their diet and then they start to add so many steps into their skincare routine and that creates a problem. A lot of things in skincare products are very irritating. They're damaging to the skin barrier, the skin microbiome. I know some people have heard of the gut microbiome, so there's a balance of, quote unquote, ‘good bacteria’ and ‘bad bacteria,’ and that's part of almost 70% of our immune system. But also our skin has a microbiome. So using a lot of soaps, even hand sanitizers, I know we all have come out of kind of COVID the pandemic and it's interesting to see the effects that that's having on people's skin barriers. So I would say start first simplifying your skincare routine and then looking at your diet and increasing fiber. That's like the first step. You want to eat the rainbow. I like to say have all the colors of the rainbow. Red, orange, green, yellow, blue. If you can think of those colors and two colors on your plate a day, usually you want to have anywhere from 30 to 40 varieties of plant foods in your week. And I'm usually only seeing maybe ten varieties in most of my clients diets. So I start simple from there. And if you're starting to notice that things are not getting better, usually inflammation can take anywhere from four to six weeks to improve. The skin cycle is about 40 days. If nothing is improving from there, then I would say you want to seek out the help of a professional and there's going to be a couple of different professionals that you want to see. It's a multidisciplinary approach. So from the skin barrier perspective, you can go to someone like a dermatologist. You can even go to someone like Esthetician. I love estheticians. I have some who work on my team because if you go to a dermatologist, it's usually they're going to give you things like steroid medications, maybe some antibiotics. And if you do have an infection on your skin that you don't know of, that can be helpful. But if you want to go maybe a more gentler holistic approach, a good trained esthetician who works on skin barrier support, someone like a Corneotherapist can really help. And then from the inside approach, you can go to someone like a registered dietitian or a clinical nutrition specialist, and of course, you want to see what they specialize in. Not every registered dietitian is going to actually specialize in skin health or gut health. So I made sure I niche myself in this area because I do see a big role when it comes to food allergy sensitivities and how they trigger any kind of flares, even when it comes to acne. A big question a lot of people will have, ‘Do I need to cut out dairy? Do I need to cut out gluten?’ It's so individualized that I say for most people, you should be going to someone who can help answer those questions because I'm very much about the precision nutrition approach. So sometimes I like to do testing to see if there's micronutrient deficiencies, really looking over food journals to see if you're getting a balance of all your macronutrients.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

I work with a registered dietitian as well, so I'm very much familiar with what Rakhi is talking about. And keeping a dietary journal as it may seem like, I don't want to have to write down everything I ate today or for two to three days, if not a week. But it actually gives your dietitian so much more to work with to see either how diverse your diet is or maybe you're getting too much of something and you shouldn't be, or you're eating foods that are actually increasing inflammation in your skin, potentially, right, depending on what it is.

Rakhi Roy:

And I will say I actually just came back from the conference. It's called FNCE. The Food Nutrition Conference and Expo. It's like this national conference that registered dietitians usually go to annually. And it was a very interesting panel. So there was two registered dietitians and a gastroenterologist that sat on this panel and they did case studies where they had clients who thought they had IBS. So irritable bowel syndrome, that's another thing. When it comes to a lot of actors, I find they do have gut symptoms like the bloating, the changes in bowel movements, and a lot of times it has to do with us being actors or performers. We do have stress. The gut mind connection is so heavily correlated, if you think before in auditions, you get those butterflies in your gut, right? I see such a heavy correlation with IBS diagnosis in this population. And what they talked about on this panel was they were going through a traditional IBS elimination diet called the low FODMAP diet. And these patients were not getting better. And finally they were like, ‘OK, let's look at your food diary.’ So, yes, it can be very tedious. And I will say, if you have a history of an eating disorder, you want to work with a registered dietitian to make sure this is not triggering your eating disorder, because sometimes reading nutrition labels and writing things down can trigger that. But what it does provide these food journals is a tool for us to kind of put our detective hat on and they were able to kind of go through these case studies and go, ‘Oh, you don't have really traditional IBS, you have something like SIBO or you have something like A-sucrase deficiency because we are able to notice patterns. And so your intervention is going to be so much different. And the quality of life a lot of times for these people get vastly improved as well. And some people, if you're an actor who works on camera, needs to lose weight or even gain weight for a role, your digestion plays such a huge part of that. I like to say you are not what you eat, you're what you digest and absorb. Right. So your stomach doesn't have teeth. You have to really chew your food properly to release enzymes, and that can affect a lot of nutrients from getting absorbed too, so it can be a huge role in how your hormones affect your health, how you carry weight, your energy levels. Really.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

That's right. And digestion starts in the mouth, and it seems obvious that's where you're putting food. Right. But at the same time, when you said that you have like the saliva of all the enzymes and everything kind of happens, I think whenever you smell something that tastes good and you start to salivate, is that kind of the beginning of the digestion process? A little?

Rakhi Roy:

Yes. I'm so glad you said that. So I actually have a diagram on my instagram. So for those who are visual, you can actually go to my instagram. It's @gut.skin.nutritionist. And I have a whole series called Gut Health 101. And so, yes, mechanical digestion begins in your mouth, but I would say psychological digestion actually begins in your brain. So if you are watching television late at night and an advertisement comes on and you start to notice some delicious food on the screen, your eyes actually register that, and that signals your eyes to your brain and your brain signals to your salivary glands to start watering. Right. Your mouth, when you watch something on TV that looks delicious, right. Your mouth starts watering. That is actually your body saying, ‘Oh, we think food is about to come in, so maybe we should just start releasing saliva.’ And saliva has these enzymes that helps kind of breaks down the starches. So, yeah, it's very fun and I get so nerdy on this stuff. But it's good for you to know the process of how your body really works and being in tune with it.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Yeah, so, absolutely. I was just thinking, going shopping while hungry… probably not a good idea because you're going to start that process and not be able to satisfy it.

Rakhi Roy:

Right, exactly. And I do tend to notice a lot of times if you are getting really hungry, usually I like to say good eating windows anywhere from three to 5 hours, like a four hour mark. Your stomach actually starts to get bloated too. A lot of times I'll see some actors, they'll get bloated or they face acid reflux, and that's usually because they're going too long stretches without eating. I've been on sets before where you just got to pack some really good snacks and not just like your starchy snacks, but protein too. I like to say PFF is your BFF. So protein, fat and fiber at every meal and snack, if you remember those three things, you are actually set up.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Oh, wow. And you didn't say carbs in there, so obviously

Rakhi Roy:

Fiber is a carb, so fibers are carbs. Right. So you have two categories of carbs, you have your starchy carbohydrates and then your non starchy carbohydrates, aka fiber. So when you think of starchy carbohydrates, think potatoes, think breads, pastas, right? And then when you think about fiber, you're going to be thinking mostly your vegetables, your fruits and whole grains, right? So if you are having starchy carbohydrates, there's a component there. If it's a whole grain, that there is some fiber that you can find, right? Even beans, lentils, chickpeas, those have some starches, but they also have fiber. So I like those types of carbohydrates and I would lump them into the fiber category because you're going to get a lot of beneficial things happening for your gut. So it's good to kind of have a variety. I like to say the plate method. If anyone grew up following the Food Pyramid, I don't know if, you know, they changed that. I think around 2011, they came out with something called the My Plate. So a good rule of thumb to just really simplify this for everybody at home is if you are eating, look at your plate, divide 50% into your non starchy foods. So think mostly vegetables, sauteed, veggies, maybe some salads, 50%. And then 25% can be your starchy carbohydrates, it can be your rice, it can be your potatoes, it can be your pastas. And then the other 25% is going to be your protein. So if you split it up into those quadrants, usually that's going to be a really good way to balance your plate.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

So how do you build dessert into that, Rakhi? ‘Cause I know there's going to be someone who says, ‘Wait a minute, I want to have my fruit too,’ because we've been hearing about vegetables and all that, but how would you put fruit into a meal or a snack?

Rakhi Roy:

So I would say fruit counts towards your fiber goal. So you can have that. You know how I said the 50% of your plate? So you can actually have fruit - I like to say fruits at breakfast and snack time and vegetables at lunch and dinner. So 50% of your bowl at breakfast can be fruits. So that's how you're going to get in your fiber from fruit sources. So fruits are not bad. I know people like to say bananas will make you gain weight, but it's not because it has fiber, right? And portion sizes matter too. And it's all individualized to the person. The more active you are, the taller you are, the more you're going to really need to eat. And I like to say there's a lot of restrictive diets out there and people want to eat less than 1000 calories to lose weight while a two year old requires 1200 calories. So if you're eating under that, you're eating less than the needs of a two year old. And that's probably where you're plateauing in your goals and why your energy might be plummeting. So there's a lot of things that I see out there really quick fixes and that's why it helps to maybe have a professional on your team that can help guide you here.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

I found that to be really useful myself, like just how to plan for snacks or what meal should be. Like if you're on the road and you're not near your normal food sources. Well, how do you find? You know. And especially if you're on set. Like if you are literally working somewhere and they've got a catering crew and maybe you can't have gluten or you can't have dairy or there's some kind of restriction there. You have to think ahead and bring your own snacks because you don't know if something's either had cross contamination or if it's like a Celiac obviously would have a lot more difficulty with this. They would always know to bring their own stuff. But I think just in general, it's always good to be aware that you need to have an emergency snack because you never know when you're going to be hungry somewhere and you're not able to prepare the meal yourself.

Rakhi Roy:

Yeah, so actually I was on set yesterday for a commercial because I'm getting back into acting and so I kind of took a look at the snack table and they actually did a pretty good job. If it's a bigger production, usually they will take your dietary preferences or your restrictions into account. So I did notice they had a variety of different types of snacks that were kind of catered to people who could have a gluten sensitivity. I didn't see a lot of dairy free options other than the fruits that were there, but you can always bring your own and bring a cooler. So that way, like if you have a yogurt, for example, if it's a non-dairy yogurt that has protein in it, you could always put that in a cooler. But what I really did like about what they did with the craft services is that they put everything kind of on ice so that way it's stayed at a good temperature and so the food didn't spoil.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Yeah, because I think is that dairy goes bad out of the fridge after 2 hours and protein like meat would be like 4 hours. I don't know.

Rakhi Roy:

Generally it's about 4 hours. So once everything's been out at temperature for about 4 hours, you need to toss it because it could have bacteria growing that you don't want there.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

No, and I think that's a big part of our conversation is just understanding how to protect our gut and how to nurture it properly because what's on the inside comes out the outside on our skin so far as just the expression of what's going on internally. So I know you said that we aren't what we eat, we're what we digest because not everyone can digest everything that they eat, which I think maybe not everyone's thinking about. So what does that mean? There's a term called ‘leaky gut’ and some people may have heard of that. I don't know what your thoughts are on the term, but could you explain what that concept is and how it affects people and how you could go about healing it?

Rakhi Roy:

So there's a lot of research that's still being done in this area, and I would say it's still kind of a nuanced term in scientific terminology. They don't really refer to it as ‘leaky gut.’ It's maybe a term that's been coined in the media. In the research you'll find it termed as ‘intestinal permeability.’ So kind of think of your gut like a brick wall and all your cells are these little bricks. And in between the bricks is this mortar, right? And so these are what we call tight junctions. And so when the mucus layer in your gut is not as robust, maybe it's been thinned out either from stress, either from use of medication, maybe you've had some food poisoning or bacteria that's gotten in, use of antibiotics, a lot of these things can kind of deplete our mucosal layer. So for a lot of people, I like to say again, going back to the basics, if you can't digest your food sometimes, I'm going to look at stomach acid. Are you a highly stressed person? If so, you want to take your time to chew your food to like an applesauce consistency if you're someone who has been using over the counter acid suppressors. So kind of think like your omeprazole types of medications that can actually make your stomach acid more alkaline. I know everyone's kind of heard of the alkaline diet, right? It's like, ‘Oh, acid is bad, alkaline is good,’ if nobody knows what I'm talking about. There's a PH scale. Essentially, if you've ever taken a science class from zero to 14, seven is neutral. That's the PH of water. And then anything under seven is going to be more acidic. Anything over seven is going to be alkaline. It's not necessarily bad or good to be one or the other. It just depends on the environment. So your stomach actually likes to be at a PH, like a 1.5 to a 3.5 when it's digesting food. If you remember I said earlier, your stomach doesn't have teeth. So how does it break down food? Stomach acid, right? It has to liquefy that food that's come down. So a lot of times stress, like I said, even food poisoning, can trigger the stomach acid to go more alkaline. And if you're using some medications long term that brings the alkalinity of your stomach acid up, it's going to have a harder time digesting that food. And that's where you see food intolerances have a big role. So really, sometimes digestive enzymes can help reducing your stress lifestyle, decreasing processed foods in your diet, or almost everything is processed. But then that doesn't necessarily mean it's always going to be bad. But what I mean by overly processed, it's kind of come to the point where the ingredients are no longer singular ingredients, and you're starting to notice that it's a very long list. So keep the ingredient list as simple as possible. And then, of course, if you're still finding you're having trouble, you can work with someone like a registered dietitian to kind of go through things. We have some testing approaches that we look at to see what could be going on. Maybe you need to go on some herbal supplements for a little bit. Sometimes things like zinc carnosine can help with the gut lining. There's a lot of things, intervention wise, we can do.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Right, and a lot of what you're saying is super amazing advice. Some of the food, how to portion your plate, applicable right now, today, probably don't need to talk to the doctor about it, but other things, like digestive enzymes or like the supplementation or herbals, I think that definitely like anything you're hearing on the show, of course, like, run by your doctor. Don't just go out and start taking any kind of…

Rakhi Roy:

Can I put a plug in there, actually?

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Of course.

Rakhi Roy:

So doctors don't get nutrition education at all. Maybe at most, it's like a semester. And I can say this because I've worked with so many doctors, and my brother is a doctor. So when I was studying for my boards, the questions that I was getting asked, like, I would quiz and I would see what questions he was getting quizzed for his boards. He cannot answer those questions. It has nothing to do with that. They just haven't been educated. So what I say is have a doctor on your team to oversee kind of your medical case, like what medications you're on, and then also have maybe an RD (registered dietitian) on your case, too, to ask about the supplements and the diet part, because they'll be able to better answer those questions. A lot of times, if you do go to your doctor, sometimes they might not have the right answer.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

That's true. I know that we have a similar up here in Canada. Certainly the dietitians have far more training in that area than, say, a medical doctor. I found that functional doctors have more training than a medical doctor in some cases, depending on their specialization. But it's really important, I think, for anyone who is wanting to seriously either improve their health or I know even people who go work out and they have, they want to be active, healthy lifestyle. Like, they'll work with a dietitian because they need to know things like, well, how much protein intake do I need to have in order to get to the place I want to be with my fitness? Or any other number of things that might be interesting when you need to work with someone who's a dietitian just because they have such a great understanding of all of the chemical side of food, but just how it interacts.

Rakhi Roy:

Yeah, we do study drug nutrient interactions as well. So that's part of our training. So we'll be able to know if you're on a medication, if this is going to be interacting with any supplements that you're taking or even the food that you're eating. So that's one part. And we can also study our labs and order some labs as well. So it takes a holistic approach. You really need to have a good team. I think that's going to be the biggest takeaway or advice. I like to say you want to build your team to help you here.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Wonderful tip. So I just wonder, how can we keep our skin healthier? Is there anything that is particularly destructive to your skin and your gut?

Rakhi Roy:

So I just say go for a whole food approach. As much as you can eat most of your foods at home, maybe go out to eat once a week. That's the most basic advice that I can recommend. I do actually have an ‘Eating for Healthy Skin from A to Zinc’ guide on my website. So it's free for anyone who's interested. And it goes over the key players. Things like vitamin A, C, which is important for collagen production, some of the B vitamins, vitamin D, a lot of people are deficient in that area. So you do want to get tested. Probably not going to get enough vitamin D from your food. So you might need to actually supplement things like selenium, zinc. The omega three fatty acids are really important. And actually it's a good thing that you did bring up seed oils because a lot of people are kind of confused. Are seed oils bad for you? Should we eliminate them? Seed oils usually are like, sunflower oil, is the most common one, I think that's in distribution. So it's not so much that seed oils are harmful, it's the ratio of omega three and omega six. And some of these seed oils tend to be higher in omega six. And when you think of an antiinflammatory diet, omega three is what you want to have in your diet that's the higher. So it has to do more so with the balance of the omega three and omega six. So if a little bit of seed oil is coming into your diet, it doesn't mean you have to throw everything away and avoid it and be fearful of that. I just like to say incorporate more omega three in your diet. So if you can have fish, things like salmon is really good, wild caught salmon. And if you are going to do a supplement, this is what I will say is really important testing. A lot of times people are not aware that your absorption rate of a supplement is not going to be the same. We're so individual, like I said at a conference, and there was a vendor there that does omega three testing and they found that one person needed a 4000 level milligram dose to maintain a healthy omega three size or. Someone else in 2000. Right. So it's so individualized when it comes to that. But like I said, there's a guide on my website and everyone can download that for free.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

That is super interesting. So just to wrap things up here, just thinking about those people who have an audition tomorrow or today, or they've got a self tape and they're like, ‘Oh my gosh, I broke out, or my Eczema is acting up or whatever, I'm going to flare.’ What can they do? It seems like this isn't really a quick fix for the situation because it is kind of a healing of the gut or, you know, the skin microbiome healing. But if they had to, if they really, really needed to kind of pull things together quickly, what would you recommend or suggest that they do in that instance?

Rakhi Roy:

Right, so this has happened to me before where I've had to do an audition really quickly. I need to fix something with my skin. Obviously, the foundation is: eat a healthy diet, always reduce alcohol you want to prevent instead of having to directly have to treat something right off the bat. But in short term fixes, I tend to find if you're using calming ingredients on your skin, things that have natural moisturizing factors, so NMF can be really soothing to the skin. A face mask, maybe that has allantoin. Again, I think it's really great if you do have access to an esthetician, maybe you can go in and then maybe they can do some calming treatment for your skin. Maybe they might be able to recommend some red light therapy to heal the skin up. And then you're usually good to go on your merry way for that day.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Well, I think there's a lot to look at on your website, Rakhi, so we had better make sure we get that link from you. So, yeah. Thank you so much for this amazing conversation. But before we do go, could you please let us know more about where people can go to learn about you and interact with you and all the neat stuff that you've shared today?

Rakhi Roy:

Absolutely. It was such a joy and pleasure. Thank you for having me. So if you'd like to connect, I have an Instagram that I'm very active on and I love to connect with everyone. My Instagram handle is gut skin nutritionist. And then my website is gutskinutritionist.com.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Fabulous. I'm just so happy that you were here because I don't know how many people are silently suffering through skin issues. Probably a lot and just kind of hiding it or masking it and whatnot. But in the acting field, there are a lot of nerves. There's a lot of just, you know, ‘did I get the job? Did I not get it?’ In the feeling of rejection and all of that takes a toll. And I think it's certainly a good thing that whatever you are putting into your body, food wise, it can actually help you to be nourished better, which will in turn, obviously not the only thing you can do, but would help to at least regulate one aspect of your wellness.

Rakhi Roy:

Yes. And I'll close out with this. I think everything kind of comes back full circle. I left or paused my acting career almost ten years ago. I would do some auditions here and there, but yes, I was so scared to put myself on tape. Sometimes I was just not feeling well and I couldn't get out of bed and I just hated the way I looked. And then just recently, a few weeks ago, I sent in an audition on World Atopic Eczema Day. And I got nervous because in the audition notes, they said, show us your hands. And I have this hyperpigmentation on my hands, so for so long I was hiding my skin. And ironically enough, here was an audition that said, show us your skin. And I said, you know what? On a whim, I'm just going to leave it up to the universe. I sent in the audition. I booked it. I found out I booked it last week and that's where I was on set yesterday. I was shooting for that commercial. So everything really just works out in the end. Just have faith. I think the universe is always working for you and not against you.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

Well, congratulations on the booking. I remember when you auditioned for it, so that was like, ‘oh, wow, it's a big step. Big one.’ So wonderful. So I think everyone will probably be on Instagram. You can check Rakhi out there. You also have your website, which you mentioned. Do you want to just plug it one more time before we go?

Rakhi Roy:

Gutskinutritionist.com is my website, and my Instagram again, is Gut.skin.Nutritionist.

Stephanie Ciccarelli:

And that's the way we saw the world through the lens of voice over this week. Thank you so much for joining us today and hearing all about gut and skin health from Rakhi Roy. She's a registered dietitian. She's awesome. She's got a great instagram. You go check that out. And also her website as well. This has been a great episode of Vox Talk. If you enjoyed it, please do let us know. You can chat with us on social media. Everything you heard was for information and educational purposes only. So thank you again to Rakhi Roy, our special guest. I'm Stephanie Ciccarelli, your host from Voices. Our producer is Geoff Bremner. We will see you next week.

Stephanie Ciccarelli
Stephanie Ciccarelli is a Co-Founder of Voices. Classically trained in voice as well as a respected mentor and industry speaker, Stephanie graduated with a Bachelor of Musical Arts from the Don Wright Faculty of Music at the University of Western Ontario. For over 25 years, Stephanie has used her voice to communicate what is most important to her through the spoken and written word. Possessing a great love for imparting knowledge and empowering others, Stephanie has been a contributor to The Huffington Post, Backstage magazine, Stage 32 and the Voices.com blog. Stephanie is found on the PROFIT Magazine W100 list three times (2013, 2015 and 2016), a ranking of Canada's top female entrepreneurs, and is the author of Voice Acting for Dummies®.
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