7 Audio Mistakes in Voice Over Recordings (and How to Fix Them) Part 2

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    In this second half of our two part episode, we continue to explore some of the most common audio recording issues that voice actors face. Just like Part 1, Host Stephanie and Co-Host Julianna, are joined by Voices.com Talent Success Specialist, Cameron Pocock, who provides expert insights and actionable tips on how to make your audio truly shine.

    Hosts: Stephanie Ciccarelli, Julianna Lantz, with special guest, Voices.com Talent Success Specialist, Cameron Pocock.

    Inspired? Get your practice on with Voice Over Sample Scripts:

    https://www.voices.com/blog/category/tools-and-resources/sample-scripts/

    Mission Audition is presented by Voices.com. Produced and Engineered by Shelley Bulmer; Scripting by Niki Clark; Chantelle Henriques and Keaton Robbins.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Hi there. I’m Stephanie Ciccarelli.

    Julianna Lantz:
    And I’m Julianna Lantz.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Welcome back to Mission Audition. As you know, this is part two of two of an awesome episode, where we are talking about common audio mistakes that talent make when they’re submitting auditions. So in our previous episode, if you haven’t heard it yet, go back, you’re going to want to do that. We covered four really common audio mistakes that talent are making on a regular basis that are really costing them work and actually a reputation in terms of what a client thinks of what you’re able to do. And we don’t want that. We want you to succeed. So at any rate, today’s show, we’ve got three mistakes that we are covering, but I want to make sure that I’m reintroducing you to Cameron Pocock, he is our talent success specialist at voices.com. We’re critiquing these auditions. They’re not really auditions, they’re mistakes, as I’ve said, voices.com team created said audio mistakes so that you can see what clients are hearing and how we can save you from making those awful but totally preventable mistakes. So, Cameron, thank you again for joining us. It’s really great to have you back in the studio.

    Cameron Pocock:
    Yeah, no problem. Thank you so much for having me out again.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Format here, just in case you were picking up on it last episode, there is a format. We are going to hear the audio first. We are not going to tell you what’s in it because that’s half the fun, it’s like find the Easter egg. And then you’re going to try to figure out what that mistake is. Then Cam’s going to jump in. He’s going to tell us what that mistake was and then also how it would have happened, the situation, circumstances that might’ve produced said mistake, we’ll listen to the better version of what could happen if you actually implement his tips. So without further ado, let’s jump into our mistake, number five.

    Sean:
    If money were not a factor, what would your dream house look like? Picture it now. Would it have a large wraparound porch and a lot of green space for a garden? Or would it be a modern condo in the heart of the city? Wherever your mind goes and whatever your dream consists of, Spending Mortgage Brokers can help you get there. Come on in and speak with one of our agents today to see what we can do for you.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Did Sean sell you that mortgage or no?

    Julianna Lantz:
    Yeah. I mean, Sean naturally has a deeper voice, but it’s not usually this deep.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    No.

    Julianna Lantz:
    What’s going on Cameron?

    Cameron Pocock:
    This is one of the more difficult sounds to reproduce, but it can be produced at many different stages in your audio. So one of the most common places I see that boomy or muddy sound originate from is specifically in the recording environment. As we talked about a little bit last episode, the room you’re recording in plays a huge role in the final sound of your auditions. And that can contribute in a few different ways. Like we’ve already seen examples where the room reflections are adding a lot of reverb, but in this specific case, we’re trying to emulate when a room is creating a buildup in what I would call the lower mid frequencies. And that’s when you’re getting something that’s going to either sound basey or boomy or something that’s going to sound really, really muddy and unclear when somebody is listening to your auditions.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Okay, so Cameron, where would we encounter this problem?

    Cameron Pocock:
    So there’s a lot of different situations in your room primarily that can contribute to that boomy sounding or really basey sounding recording. And one thing to be mindful of is that if you’re recording in that standard kind of bedroom size, maybe that more boxy shape, that can lead to some low, mid resonance building up in that room between the walls. Something to be mindful of is the actual space you’re recording in and a solution to this that I’ve seen a lot of talent use is like a treated recording booth. Or maybe they’re recording in a closet with lots of soft surfaces, even isolation booths, they’ve done a great job of minimizing background noise. They’ve done a great job of cutting out a lot of those high frequencies that reflect in rooms, but sometimes depending on the placement of your microphone, even in those booths, you can pick up a low mid resonance, which can make your voice sound a little too low, heavy, again, a little too boomy or a little too muddy.

    Julianna Lantz:
    What does low mid residence mean?

    Cameron Pocock:
    Sure. That’s a great question. So in your own software, you might’ve encountered it, a plugin called an equalizer, and that’s a great visual representation of what I’m talking about, the frequency spectrum. And so all audio, all sound is represented somehow on this frequency spectrum. So when I’m talking about low mids, I’m talking about the lower frequency ranges in recorded audio that would start at 400 to 300 Hertz, 100 to 200 Hertz, that kind of area. That’s the lowest information we’re going to be worried about as far as the audio we’re recording now, and then all the way up to really, really high end frequencies that can go up to maybe 20,000 Hertz. And a great way to visualize this is if you were to cut out the low end of your voice, that’s when it would sound very, very tinny. If you were to cut out the high end of your voice, that’s where it would sound very muddy and basey. So that’s a great way to represent the frequency spectrum.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Cool. Yeah, that’s a great explanation. Thank you.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    So shall we hear the clean version?

    Sean:
    If money were not a factor, what would your dream house look like? Picture it now. Would it have a large wraparound porch and a lot of green space for a garden? Or would it be a modern condo in the heart of the city? Wherever your mind goes and whatever your dream consists of, Spending Mortgage Brokers can help you get there. Come on in and speak with one of our agents today to see what we can do for you.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Wow.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Way better.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Yeah. Yeah.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Way better.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Absolutely. Can totally hear the difference.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Yeah. So what did you do to fix it?

    Cameron Pocock:
    So in this specific example, that was the same audio. To keep in mind, we recorded this still in the treated studio room so it was a little bit of a harder sound to reproduce. But what I did was I cut out around 100 to 200 Hertz or also another cut around 300 to 400 Hertz. There’s two different situations where you would want to make these cuts. The first is if you notice it sounding basey or boomy, really loud, and for lack of a better word, maybe explody in the low end, cutting out around 100 to 200 Hertz by just a couple of decibels at a time, maybe two decibels to start. And then a little more if the problem consists. That’s a great way to start. And when you’re looking to do this, finding some YouTube videos as resources for your own audio software, maybe you’re using Audacity, looking up how to use EQ in Audacity would be a great way to show you how to make heads or tails of all those different functions in an equalizer plugin.

    Cameron Pocock:
    The next solution is to look at if your audio is sounding muddy or muffled. This is when it’s not necessarily sounding really basey, but it’s sounding really like … Right? Maybe it’s affecting the understanding of your auditions. If you find it’s harder to hear what words you’re actually saying and hearing your pronunciation, that’s when it might be sounding muddy or muffled.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    So kind of unintelligible.

    Cameron Pocock:
    Absolutely.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Or like indiscernible. Like when you go to transcribe something and it’s like, this word is indiscernible. That’s the last thing you want is for a client to have their script read aloud in a way that they don’t understand what you said.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Yeah. If you don’t pronounce their company name discernibly, if that’s the right word.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    I believe it is.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Yeah.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    We’ll go with it anyway.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Yeah. If you don’t pronounce their company named correctly or intelligently, they’re not going to use you.

    Cameron Pocock:
    Absolutely. So I think again, if it’s sounding unintelligible, like we spoke about that’s when looking at cutting around 300 to 400 Hertz could be useful and everybody’s voice is different. The low mids of your voice could sit in a slightly different range. That’s why it’s really important to listen critically, try to AB compare the changes you make before and after you add these EQ effects.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    To put you on the spot here Cameron and just because we’ve not heard any demos by women yet. So I know that they’re coming. So everyone, if you’ve been like, why is it so male heavy? Like, no, we’ve got some awesome reads coming out. Don’t worry about it. But like if it’s a female voice and if there is an equivalent for a boomy or muddy sound, what would that be? Because we’ve got treble voices for the most part. So how would a woman know if her voice is not being brought across in that way that it naturally should be if captured properly?

    Cameron Pocock:
    So I think you can refer to the same tools by seeing if the low end is sounding really percussive again, to look for that basey sound or if it’s sounding unintelligible and a little muffled. I find female voices don’t run into these issues as often as male voices. But if you do, using the same technique, starting at about 100 to 200 Hertz, if it’s sounding basey and percussive and starting at about 300 to 400 Hertz, if it’s sounding muddy. But also being willing to move those up and take away some of the even higher frequencies, maybe you can move up to even 600 Hertz for that muddy sound to takeout on a female voice.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Yeah, every voice is different as we all know. There are some mezzo-contralto type voices, and certainly they may potentially in their lower registers, run into this issue. But in our next couple of samples, we do have female voices.

    Cameron Pocock:
    Absolutely.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    So I want us to pay very special attention to what that means in terms of the advice we’re giving to because so far, everybody knows, we’ve heard all male reads. We’re about to hear some female ones. So why don’t we move on to our next audio mistake.

    Shelly:
    Facts about the Rio Carnival. Fact, the Carnival in Brazil is always held 40 days before Easter. Fact, Rio Carnival is registered in the Guinness Book of World Records as the biggest carnival in the world. Fact, learning about the Rio Carnival at the Rio Carnival is way better than reading about it online. Get your facts through travel, book through globalfestivaltour.com.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    All right. I think that was Shelly.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Yeah, that’s our producer.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Shelly, who is producing and sitting right here. That was not awkward in the least, was it Shelly? But I’m sure it was fun making that mistake. So Cameron, why don’t you tell us about what it is because Shelly’s wonderful. She’s got a great voice, clearly knows what she’s doing. How did you design this mistake?

    Cameron Pocock:
    So this is a mistake I run into fairly often. Something I see almost every day with my consultations. And what we’re hearing here is that the voice is sounding a little bit tinny or a little bit thin. Those are two words I would use to describe the texture we’re hearing in this audio. And some of the causes of this mistake might be that the talent is too far back from the microphone. This is something else we addressed in the last podcast episode when we talked about things like room reflections and reverb, or even background noise. This same mistake of being a little too far back from the microphone can also give you that tinny, thin sound because your microphone isn’t really effectively picking up the body of your voice. And that’s those low mids we talked about. Again, we don’t want them to be muddy or boomy, but we want them to be present and usable in the client’s use case for your audition.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Yeah. And so this low mids thing, does this have to do with vocal resonance and support and in the distance proximity to the mic? Would you say that some of that factors in too? Because if a voice sounds like it’s thin then is it more of a support issue perhaps?

    Cameron Pocock:
    I think it could absolutely be in the way you’re giving your read too. The most common way is definitely the distance of the microphone. Usually I can help a talent fix their sound just by stepping within that thumb to pinkie range again. Sometimes it is behind the actual performance of the take too. Sometimes it’s about adding a little more power to your read as well, if you find you’re being a little whispery or a little quiet. Some talent I’ve run into, they may be don’t consider changing the volume on their interface or microphone. And when they hear themselves clipping, they’ll give quieter reads on average. Maybe there’ll be a little whispery with their read. So something to remember is that you can always adjust the volume on your interface or the volume on your USB microphone, if it has that option. And that means you can get close. You can give a nice, confident read without having to worry about getting too loud and clipping, but you can also pick up the body of your voice.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Cameron is a good first line of defense when looking at why someone isn’t seeing success on the website. But if there are issues that go beyond what we’re talking about now, you’d have to work with a coach. There is no two ways about it. A coach is going to help you get to the bottom of those performance issues. They’re going to help mold your brain to give the performance the way Cameron is helping to mold your brain to give the right audio help. So we’ve luckily got a big database of coaches that we work with. So we can really tailor who we suggest to you based off of what your needs are. And I noticed Cameron doing this again on a daily basis.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    There are a lot of fantastic coaches. For those of you who are new to Mission Audition, and maybe new to me, I’m a voice major. So sometimes when I’m talking, I’m drawing upon a background that not everyone else may have who’s listening or it’s just kind of like, oh, well, where’s she getting that from? So I don’t coach talent either but I have that background and I just want to make sure that as we’re talking through these technical issues, that sometimes it isn’t always about how someone reads something in the character they’re getting to. No, like it can actually be about placement issues, it can be about support, like from your diaphragm or whether you’re standing, if your posture is correct. So bringing that perspective to the show, I just wanted to make sure that as we talked about something like this, we surface all the issues that may be related to that sound issue. But absolutely this is something that a voiceover coach or someone who does some kind of voice coaching in general, someone who teaches breathing for that matter. These people are better equipped to help with those topics.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Well, and remember guys that it’s not just new to the site talent that can benefit from coaching. It’s also talent who have been successful in the industry and are looking to brush up on their skills. They can benefit from working with an expert, like voiceover coach or Cameron.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Lifelong learning.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Yeah, absolutely.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Lifelong accountability. See your voice and what you’re able to do with it. So now we’re going to listen to the clean version of the audio.

    Shelly:
    Facts about the Rio Carnival. Fact, the Carnival in Brazil is always held 40 days before Easter. Fact, Rio Carnival is registered in the Guinness Book of World Records as the biggest carnival in the world. Fact, learning about the Rio Carnival at the Rio Carnival is way better than reading about it online. Get your facts through travel, book through globalfestivaltour.com.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Great read.

    Cameron Pocock:
    So, one thing to keep in mind is that you can absolutely boost and take away in the EQ function and to fix this tinny and thin problem, a great way to do that is to try boosting 100 to 200, or try boosting at 300 to 400 or trying those other low and low mid ranges. But if you’re not close enough to the mic and that information really just isn’t picked up well by your microphone, you can boost all you want and all you’re going to be bringing up with some more nasty room sounds. So that’s why making sure you’re getting close on the microphone is a really, really important first step.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    All right, so let’s move on to our next audio mistake.

    Jolene:
    To be one of today’s top models, you need poise, beauty and that elusive je ne sais quoi. Do you have what it takes? Find out on Wednesday’s episode of So You Want To Be A Supermodel, only on Fashionista TV. Call your local cable provider for more information.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Wow. Jolene had a lot of cups of coffee today.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Sounds like it’s really close. It’s really close together, but Cameron, maybe our ears are deceiving us. What are we hearing?

    Cameron Pocock:
    I think you absolutely picked up on what the audio problem we tried to reproduce for this step is, and it’s a combination of quite a few different things. Auditions are really tricky territory because there’s a fine line between wanting to fix any problems you hear, but also wanting to leave a lot of room for clients to hear the potential for their own production and their changes that they want to make to your audio. So what we’ve done here is we’ve added a lot of limiting. We’ve added a lot of compression and we’ve cut out absolutely all breaths and pauses in this take. That is something we definitely don’t advise doing. Because number one, it’s going to take up a lot of your time to do that. It’s really intensive to go through and make sure you’re cutting out absolutely every space, absolutely every breath, tweaking all your compressors and all your limiters every time you do a recording. And beyond that, it’s also going to actually negatively affect your chances with a lot of different clients.

    Cameron Pocock:
    Typically they’re very, very skilled, either audio people themselves, or they’ve got their own teams or third party sources that do those editing projects for them. And you really want to make sure that you’re not adding anything that can’t be taken out later, which is what we’re hearing here. If a client wanted to add those silences back in, add those breasts back in, they’re not going to be able to because that information just isn’t there anymore. If they’re going to want to add their own compression, add their own limiting, that’s going to be difficult because you’ve already permanently put in your own compression or limiting. Maybe that wasn’t even what they wanted to do with that project. They might’ve wanted to keep the end deliverable for their project maybe more natural sounding. And that’s something they now no longer have the ability to do once they’re listening to your compressed audio.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Yeah. Well this kind of hearkens back to Shelly Shenoy’s episode where she’s talking about like, don’t do someone else’s job. Right.

    Cameron Pocock:
    Exactly.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Yeah. So you’re not the audio engineer so far as the one who is mixing and mastering an entire project. So don’t take on the mantle of the audio engineer who is responsible for that aspect of production. It just sounded unnatural to me, I think.

    Cameron Pocock:
    Absolutely.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Like we go back to when you don’t breathe, it sounds like you’re not human.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Well and, just to ask a question, what’s limiting?

    Cameron Pocock:
    Sure. So that’s a fantastic question. I think a good place to start would be explaining compression as a tool first. Compression is essentially lowering the volume of your peaks in your audio. You can set it in a few different ways. You can set how sensitive it is, how quickly it works. I typically refer talent to a pretty in-depth guide on compression because it’s not something that’s easy to explain in a single sitting. But the best way to think about it is it’s taking down the peaks and it’s raising the volume of your entire audio to make up for that. So it gives you a more consistent sound, it can also make your audio a little bit louder if that’s what you want it to do.

    Cameron Pocock:
    When it comes to limiting, it’s another type of compression, but it’s working very, very quickly. So it’s pulling down the peaks of your audio very, very fast and jumping back up again very, very quickly. And it’s great. Again, if you want to just take off some of the peaks in your audio. I’ve heard some talent use tools like limiting effectively where you don’t really notice it. It’s just helping them get a little more transparent volume from their auditions. But on the other hand, if you use limiting too heavy handedly, it can create what I would call a very crushed sound, right? So it takes a lot of the dynamics out of your voice. It makes it very, very thick sounding, which can be good if you’re a producer and you want that effect on your final project. But if someone’s looking to use your voice as a single component in their project, that can absolutely reduce your chances to zero.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    No one likes zero.

    Cameron Pocock:
    Absolutely not.

    Julianna Lantz:
    We’re trying to get you jobs. Yeah.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    We want to go to from zero to hero here, right?

    Julianna Lantz:
    Absolutely.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Anyway, that’s awesome. I think it’s time for us to hear the really great version.

    Jolene:
    To be one of today’s top models, you need poise, beauty and that elusive je ne sais quoi. Do you have what it takes? Find out on Wednesday’s episode of So You Want To Be A Supermodel only on Fashionista TV. Call your local cable provider for more information.

    Julianna Lantz:
    So much better.

    Cameron Pocock:
    So how we improved on this audio file is actually by doing less, turning off some effects and undoing some of the editing we did to make that example. And that’s what I’m going to recommend talent do when they find their auditions are just sounding over-processed. You might have done a great job of removing some mouth noises, being really tasteful and removing problems, but you might listen back and say, wow, I think I removed too much space, that’s not flowing conversationally. So the step to fix that is just to undo some of those changes and try to be a little more tasteful with removing some of maybe the distracting problems.

    Julianna Lantz:
    And actually some of you coaches listening might recognize Jolene’s voice because she’s our coaching partnership specialist.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    That’s right. You hear from her every month, if not more. So thanks to all our coaching partners out there who are listening. Hope you share this with your students. All right. Wow.

    Julianna Lantz:
    I hope you appear on the episode too.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Yeah, that too. That would be a lot of fun. I know we’ve had some coaches on and absolutely we would love to share your perspective. I did say go back to the Shelly Shenoy episode to reference that don’t do someone else’s job. That’s actually episode number two. First episode is Rachel Elena. Great episode. Second episode that we’ve got is Shelly Shenoy and our third episode features Eric Wibbelsmann and that was a fun one too.

    Julianna Lantz:
    Okay. So Cameron, what’s your advice about taking out breaths and how to make it sound natural?

    Cameron Pocock:
    So that’s a really, really great question. And I think almost every talent I talked to seemed to have a different perspective on this from their own experience too. But what I find right now, which is being successful the most often for talent with their auditions is when you leave breaths in. So there’s perspective that it helps your voice sound natural in your takes. But when you can identify a specific breath is sounding distracting, maybe in volume or in tone, that’s when you can either minimize the volume or maybe take that specific breath out. But you want to make sure that when a client is listening to your audition, it’s really believable and authentic

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    One more question Cameron, while we’ve got you here. What happens when somebody uses a breath to make a word? So if you really so, it’s almost like the inhalation becomes part of that word. How can someone breathe and then leave enough space, some time and then speak?

    Cameron Pocock:
    No, that’s a great question. And I think that has a lot to do with developing that same critical ear we talked about earlier. Knowing what you can change at the source to get you closer to the sound you want instead of making awkward edits later on. So I think a great method to address what you talked about is trying to take a really full and deep breath, breathing deeper in your diaphragm, instead of just keeping air kind of more shallow to make sure that you have enough energy in your breaths to talk for more lengths, without having to stop, to take multiple, multiple breaths at every stage in a read.

    Julianna Lantz:
    I’ve also had conversations with coaches who said that instead of, and then speaking, breathe in through your nose as you’re reading, and then you won’t have those issues. Fixing the problem at the source is always what we want to do.

    Cameron Pocock:
    Stephanie, did you have any perspective on breathing as a vocal major?

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Well, I like to breathe. That’s just a thought.

    Cameron Pocock:
    I had a talent tell me on the phone that, “I edit out my breaths because I don’t like breathing.”

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Really?

    Julianna Lantz:
    What?

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Someone actually told you that? That is bizarre. I mean, it’s just part of life. About breathing, I think that it’s something that you need to be intentional about. Breathing in general is involuntary. You don’t really think about it as you do it normally just as you don’t think about your heart beating, you don’t think, it just happens. But that said, when you’re in front of a microphone and it literally picks up every itty bitty thing that you do, you really have to be intentional about it. And you’ve got to make the right kind of space for that breath to go in. And like in singing, for instance, you need to take that breath to set yourself up to do something. So you’ve got to think about making the space like, and then going. So it could be that you don’t include that sound, but you do have that breath ready to go when you need it.

    Julianna Lantz:
    So we’ve talked a lot about audio standards or audio tips for when you’re auditioning, which is where these would apply to having a little bit more room for producers to put their take on it. What about audio tips for demos?

    Cameron Pocock:
    So demos are definitely a little bit of a different world than your auditions. There’s definitely nothing wrong with using some audio that similar to what your auditions sound like for some demos. That’s not necessarily a problem, I’ve seen some talent do that to success, especially when they’re trying to fill out their portfolio without spending endless amounts of time doing fully produced demos. But what I do recommend is even if you’re not using these tools like compression or limiting on your auditions, being comfortable with them longterm is going to be a really important tool in your skillset. And a great place to use these as on your demos because that’s where it doesn’t hurt to have that really clean produced sound, showing what your voice can sound like in a final product. Because that’s important for clients to hear too. With auditions, they’re wanting to hear your voice raw in a way that they can envision just taking that audio file and fitting it right into their project.

    Cameron Pocock:
    With your demos, there’s no problem with showing them how you envision your voice sounding in a final product, in a commercial, in a compilation, in all those different settings. And so that’s why being comfortable with those compression, limiting, even de-breathing, those methods, being comfortable with them is still useful in that method. And also learning to play with background music and how to mix that in effectively with your own voice.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    We will have to have you back Cameron another time, because I’ve just got some more audio issues that are coming to mind.

    Julianna Lantz:
    So many good ideas.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Yeah, of course. We will definitely have you back. Julianna, any thoughts from you on this?

    Julianna Lantz:
    I’m really excited for everyone to know what’s in Cameron’s brain and put it into the studio. It’s one thing when I listen to him everyday talking one on one to people, it’s so cool for what you’re saying to be said to people in a larger audience.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    Cameron, do you have any other words of wisdom or anything that you want to share that you haven’t yet said?

    Cameron Pocock:
    One way to summarize everything we’ve talked about in these last two episodes when it comes to recording and when it comes to editing is it’s really important to listen to a lot of really good audio on your own. And it’s really important to compare your audio against sources that are being used in a professional context and learning to critically hear the differences for yourself too. And teaching yourself to have a good ear, because even if you’ve got all the best practices in play at a certain time, you want to be aware of if something starts to change too, right? Maybe you get a little further off the microphone without noticing it. You want to be able to critically hear those changes when they happen and adjust your own performance and your own editing to make up for those changes.

    Cameron Pocock:
    And when it comes to again, using any of these tips, when it comes to EQ, when it comes to processing, think about it from a client’s perspective. You never want them to listen to your audio and have to hear the fixes they’re going to have to do. You don’t want them to hear, oh man, this is too quiet. I’m going to have to really, really find some interesting ways to turn this up. Or maybe there’s a lot of background noise. I’m going to have to remove the background noise myself, but you also want to leave room for them to add their own processing and their own effects.

    Julianna Lantz:
    That’s one of the key points of online auditioning is clean audio. The cleaner your audio, the easier you are to work with. And I know in other ways of getting voice over work, audio isn’t such a huge component, but in online casting, it is one of the most crucial aspects to master.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    We all hope that you loved these two very special episodes, very different episodes of Mission Audition. That said, if you’re listening and you’re like, of course I love them. It’s so cool. Well, the best way to show us that appreciation is actually to give the podcast a rating and review. And wherever you’re listening, be it Google Play, iTunes, just go there and say, you know what? I really enjoyed this about the podcast, give it a rating and then it will help other people discover what it is because that’s ultimately the mission of Mission Audition, is to help you and other voice actors to succeed on our platform and beyond, if you’d like to get your practice on, you can get all of the script samples used in this episode and more absolutely for free from our blog at voices.com/blog. You can find them under resources. And until the next time I’m Stephanie Ciccarelli.

    Julianna Lantz:
    And I’m Julianna Lantz.

    Cameron Pocock:
    And I’m Cameron Pocock.

    Stephanie Ciccarelli:
    We’ll see you next time.

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    Stephanie Ciccarelli is the Co-Founder and Chief Brand Officer of Voices.com. Classically trained in voice, piano, violin and musical theatre, as well as a respected mentor and industry speaker, Stephanie graduated with a Bachelor of Musical Arts from the Don Wright Faculty of Music at the University of Western Ontario. Possessing a great love for imparting knowledge and empowering others, her podcast Sound Stories serves an audience that wants to achieve excellence in storytelling. Stephanie is found on the PROFIT Magazine W100 list three times (2013, 2015 and 2016), a ranking of Canada's top female entrepreneurs, and is the author of Voice Acting for Dummies®.

    7 COMMENTS

    1. I learned some very important things from this video, especially about not editing out the majority of my breathing or overprocessing my audition. Lots of great gems in this presentation. Thank you!!

      • Thank you for sharing and for listening, Loralee! I’m pleased to hear that the advice you heard on Mission Audition was useful to you right away. Thanks for being part of the Mission Audition community!

      • Hi Eric,

        We usually recommend normalizing to -1dB. The gain needs to be acceptable on the way in as well so that the normalizing wont over-compress the audio. Louder auditions tend to be naturally preferred to clients, so we always recommend normalizing to be as loud as their competitors.

        I hope that helps!
        Oliver

    2. Thank you for sharing your expertise in these two episodes! I’m new to professional voice work (though I’ve spent a number of years producing podfic from a more fannish standpoint), and the audition tips were really helpful– especially, as another commenter noted, about not doing a lot of editing for the audition files compared to demo files, I would not have thought of having it be a bit more “raw” for the client to see what they can do on the audio engineer end, as I’m used to doing all my own editing as an amateur and podficcer. It was great to listen to all of your discussions, looking forward to checking out the other podcast episodes!

      • Hi Helen,

        Wow, thanks for your comment, and thanks for listening to Mission Audition!

        Wishing you the best,
        Oliver

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