Tips for Voice Actors

Video: How To Submit A Voice Talent Audition

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fG1YoW8auc

Are you ready to start auditioning? If you were thinking of getting started with Voices.com this video will show you to see how easy it is.

How Do You Start?

After you log in you’ll go to the jobs menu at the top and click on hiring. You’ll see a list of all the jobs you can choose to audition for. Click on the title of the job that you’d like to audition for to open it.

The first thing you’re going to do is review the posting and decide if it’s really right for you and learn a little bit more about what they’re looking for. Take a look at the category, word count, and the budget as well. See when the job was posted and what date the client would like responses by. There’s more information here about the type of voice they’re looking for, like the accent, role and styles, gender, and the voice age range. This can help you prioritize auditions.

About the Job

Next, you’ll see a description of the posting. Read this section carefully because if the client has a specific request or question you’ll need to answer it in your proposal.

If the client has the script ready, you’ll see it attached here, or a sample of it here. If they attach the entire script please know that you’re not meant to read the entire script, you only need to read 20-30 seconds of the script. If they choose a sample of the script and add it here, then this is the part you’ll want to read. It’s nice for the client if they can hear you and everyone else reading the same lines. It makes it easier for them to compare one read to the next.

You also can see more information about the client posting the job here.

After you’ve reviewed the posting, you can send your audition!

The Proposal

You don’t have to write a proposal from scratch every time – you can actually use templates! To add a new template click on add template. Give your template a subject, the client doesn’t see this, but it’s for your reference to know which template it is.

Write your message and then click save.

You can edit or delete your existing templates too. To speed up your auditioning process you’ll want to have a variety of templates, for example, one for public or private jobs or one for when you’re out of the studio and auditioning on the app.

Back on the auditioning page you can use your new templates. Again, go to the jobs menu, click on hiring, then on the title of the job posting and once that has loaded then click on reply to job.

You can click here to see all of the templates you have. Click on one to use it.

It will populate automatically for you. You can either use the template as is, or you can edit it slightly to personalize it to the job.

Quoting

The next step is your quote. Scroll down to the bottom of the page to see the posting again. You’ll want to look at the word count and the category to decide how much you’re going to charge. The best part about Voices.com being an open market place is that you can charge your own rates. You can quote whatever you feel is best for the job. If you would like a little help with figuring out what’s acceptable you can use our rate sheet.

A tip for you is to know that most people get hired when they quote around the middle to just above the middle of the budget range.

Let’s enter your quote into the “your fee” section. You’ll see that the SurePay Escrow fee of 20% is automatically added. Then the client’s total is below. We always suggest that you enter the amount that you would like to get paid under your fee.

The Audition

It’s time at last to record your audition! Remember, it’s best to only read 20-30 seconds of the script. Most clients only listen to the first 5-10 seconds, so 20-30 seconds works well. Reading a portion of the script is a great way to protect your work as well. There’s no need to watermark your auditions. Watermarking can be very distracting to the client, even if you only leave out a few words it’s better to do that than to watermark your audition. Another suggestion is to read part of the script from the beginning and end, or even the beginning, middle and end. This is especially effective when there are changes in the tone of the script. If the client can get a feel for how your voice will sound throughout the entire script that’s best. If there’s a tag line with the company’s name, make sure to get that in there too.

The last thing you’ll do is upload your audition. Click here on select your audition MP3 to upload it, look for the file and click on it, then click on open and then wait for it to upload. A best practice is to name your file with the job number and your name.

You should always preview your audition. Once you’re ready to send in your audition, click on send audition.

Congratulations!

After you’ve submitted your audition you can go to the answered folder to see it, just click on answered. There is a list of all of the jobs that you’ve auditioned for. You can come here to see if someone else has been hired, see the status change here. You can also see if a client has listened to or liked your audition. If you see an ear icon that means it was listened to, if you see a thumbs up that means the client listened to it and liked it.

It’s really quite an easy process to submit an audition on Voices.com. Hopefully these tips have helped you to see that it’s possible to audition quickly and easily. Start auditioning today and book work on Voices.com. Happy auditioning!

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Comments

  • Matlyn Smith
    August 14, 2017, 7:21 am

    I love to sing there seems to be barrier that seem to be getting in my way. I would love to come in and sing or brainstorm better technics I have some training and have a open mind to learning new things. I use to love music and dance as passionate as singing I am still interested but access to the training I need to be one of the best would be a requirement for a contract.

    Reply