A blues band is jamming out on the side of the street looking real relaxed.

Are you working on female movie character voices that pull people into the world that’s been created? Strong script reading and proper character delivery on the movie trailer’s voice over is crucial. This sample movie trailer voice over script is great for you to brush up on reading for a full-length movie spot.

For Clients Looking for Voice Over Script Examples for Movie Trailers

These scripts include specifications like voice age, gender, job description, role, accent, etc., much like voice over job postings on Voices.com. So (if you’re looking for a voice actor), the next time you post a job on Voices.com, you’ll know what job posting format will bring about the best auditions. This formatting helps voice actors to better understand the vision you had for your project, and bring it to life in their read.

For Voice Actors Looking for Voice Over Practice Scripts

Feel free to use these movie trailer scripts for practice reads! Keep in mind when auditioning for jobs, it is recommended to only provide a small portion of the read in your demo. For example, 7 to 15-second read of a 30-second script will suffice for your audition demo.

Go North On Clark

Client: Go North On Clark –  The movie
Voice Age: Older mid-60s
Gender: Female
Job Description: Go North On Clark is a full-length biopic. It follows the life of Nettie Johnson, a weathered blues singer at a Chicago tourist blues joint, who was one of the biggest blues acts in the Midwest in the late 1960s.
Artistic Direction: The voice of the hero can be described as tired, tough, aged, raspy, gritty and rugged. The script contains a combination of voice over and conversations between characters from scenes in the film.
Category: Biopic feature film
Industry: Movies
Style: Nettie (current age – mid-60s): Tired, tough, aged, raspy, gritty, rugged
Lucile: Motivating, nurturing, sincere, warm, genuine, concerned
Nettie (late teen): angry, attitude, serious, skeptic, tough, youthful
Language: English
Accent: Nettie (current age): US (Chicago- midwestern)
Lucile: US Mid-Atlantic (Virginian)
Nettie (late teen): Soft US Mid-Atlantic (Virginian)
Word Count: 1-minute: 240 words
30-second: 113 words
15-second: 52 words

 

1-Minute Movie Trailer Voice Over Script Sample

Scene setter:

A shaky Nettie Johnson takes a sip of her tonic water and exhales as long as she can. She’s tucked in at a small booth near the front of the stage of Blue Moon, a hole-in-the-wall, tourist blues joint. The place is packed and she’s minutes away from performing.

Richard James and the house band are warming up the crowd. The energy in the room is palpable.


Nettie: “I’ve been doin’ the same gig here for 32 years. 32 years. Singing the same old tunes, for the same old rich yuppies. Don’t know if I can keep going.”

[The server rushes past Nettie before she could catch their eye.]

Nettie VO: “I need another drink.”

Nettie: “Mam!”

[Nettie starts to recall a conversation she had with Richard a few days prior, while she tightly grips her tonic water and lime.]

Richard VO: “Nettie. Um. You see, the boys and I. Well, we wanted to talk to you about bringing on Jimmy’s daughter. You know, just for her to cut her chops with a few gigs.”

[Server rushes past to bring some drinks to another table.]

Nettie: “Excuse me! I need another drink!”

Nettie VO: “She not hearing me?”

Richard VO: “She’s got a great voice Nettie. Jimmy and I agree. Sure does sound a heck of a lot like you when we was touring on the East Coast.”

Richard (yelling from the stage front mic): “Ladies and Gentlemen. Allow me to introduce the ever-accomplished, Queen of Chicago Blues. Miss Nettie Johnson!”

[Nettie takes a final chug of her tonic water and slowly climbs up onto the stage. Hunched over, she holds onto the mic for support.]

Nettie: “Who’s ready to hear a story about a little girl from Virginia who became the Queen of Blues?”

[Audience claps. House band starts to play. And the shot fades out.]


30-Second Movie Trailer Voice Over Script Sample

Scene setter:

It’s late November and the city of Chicago has gone grey, rainy and cold. Nettie is sitting alone and in silence, on a bus headed from the South Side to the inner-city laundromat that she’s worked at as her day job, for the past 25 years. She begins to recall a childhood conversation with her mother, Lucile, on the commute.

[Nettie’s staring off through the dirty bus window.]

Lucile VO: “Nettie, child. You got a voice. You gotta set that voice on a lampstand, to speak a lil’ light into this dark part of Virginia. I loved hearing that voice in choir.”

Nettie (late-teen) VO: “Mama. I don’t like singing them songs. I don’t like the way they make me feel. I told you. I like singing the blues.”

[A onboarding passenger brushes against Nettie’s legs that are hanging out in the bus aisle. She looks around and shivers.]

Lucile VO: “You’re breakin’ your mama’s heart talkin’ like that. You gotta use that voice the Lord gave ya for good.”

Nettie (late-teen) VO: “But I’ve got nothin’ good to sing about!”

[Shot from outside of the moving bus of Nettie, with a blank gaze, staring through the window.]

15-Second Movie Trailer Voice Over Script Sample

Scene setter:

Nettie has just opened up the laundromat. She’s in the process of turning on the lights and machines. Most of the units are quite old and banged-up. Some of the lights flicker and struggle to turn on. As the voice over is read, a slow shot of her walking down the row of washers and dryers is shown.

Nettie VO: “Do you ever wonder to yourself. ‘How on earth did I get here?’”

“I ask it all the time and I still don’t got an answer. The only woman who can tell ya, is buried in a cemetery outside of Richmond, Virginia…It’s about time I pay mama a visit.”

[Nettie kicks a dryer. It lights up and she starts humming the tune of ‘Hey Joe’ as she walks into the back of the laundromat.]

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