Is your Voices.com profile generating enough audition opportunities for you?

Do you think you could be doing better on the site?

If you want to get ahead of the competition, cozy up with a cup of coffee or tea and take some notes! The top ten profile mistakes voice talent make are completely avoidable.

Updated Profile = More Opportunities

Whether you’re filling out your profile for the first time or giving it a fresh look with an update, you’ll want to review this article. My name is Jennifer Smith. I’m the Director of Talent Sales here at Voices.com and today I will be giving you my best profile tips while explaining why it’s important to fill out your profile well.

Why Have a Profile?

Let’s start by giving some thought to the purpose of your profile. Here’s a short list for you to consider:

  • To allow your demos to be found on Voices.com
  • To tell clients about you, your voice and your business
  • Stand apart from the competition
  • To sell your services
  • Build your brand
  • Give a client confidence that you’re the right voice for their project
  • To properly match up to job postings so that you get invited to the appropriate jobs
  • Filling out your profile properly ensures your page is optimized for internet searches
  • To make it easier for you to book work!

Now with that business and marketing point of view in mind, let’s continue. Over the years, I have noticed some common mistakes that people make when filling out their profile. Let’s review these now and why it’s important to avoid them.

1. Not Using Keywords Effectively

Keep in mind that Voices.com is web-based, so everything is automated and based on written copy. If you don’t explain what your voice sounds like, the types of voice-over you’re interested in or even the celebrities you can sound like, then it’s impossible for a client to find you based on those qualities. The best places to add keywords are the Highlights section of your bio and the description of each demo. Those areas are searchable for keyword searches and when matched to a client’s search, will bring up the matching demo.

2. Not Understanding VoiceMatch

The VoiceMatch score is out of 100 and puts a numerical value on how well your profile is matched to a job posting.

The important thing to know is that when a client reviews the auditions, they’re listed for them in order of VoiceMatch instead of the order they’re sent in. You can submit an amazing audition but if it doesn’t get listened to, then it’s a waste.

When you’re looking at the long list of auditions you can sort them in order of the VoiceMatch score to prioritize your auditions. More of them will be listened to and you’ll have a better chance of being hired. In #3 – #5, I’ll cover ways to help improve your VoiceMatch score.

3. Wrong Language Order

On your bio be sure to list the languages you speak in order of fluency. The order is important because you’ll get the highest VoiceMatch score for the first language and then 5 less points for each consecutive language.

You’ll notice that we have several categories with different accents for more popular languages like English and Spanish, so be sure to list all that apply. If you don’t have a language listed, you won’t see jobs posted in that language category.

Now, if you’re one of those talented people that can speak multiple languages it’s okay to have a less popular language towards the bottom of the list. If you have a lower VoiceMatch score for say, Russian, it’s okay because we don’t have as many Russian talent.

You don’t need to worry about being at the top of the client’s list because they may only have 10-15 auditions to choose from and will be more likely to listen to them all.

4. Putting Your Demos in Just One or Two Categories

Try searching for a talent yourself, and you’ll see that clients can do a category-based search. If you have all of your demos under “Radio,” then you will only be found in a search for a radio demo.

Another thing to consider is your VoiceMatch score. We assume that you’re more qualified and/or interested in a certain area when you have a demo in that category, gender, language and age range.

If you add demos to several categories you’ll see higher VoiceMatch scores for jobs in all of your areas of expertise. For each demo category that matches to the job posting, your VoiceMatch score will increase by 5 points.

5. Not Having Tag Words on Your Demos

You’ll notice when a client posts their job that it will include two tag words.

The job posting will say, “sounds like: friendly and professional” and is meant to give you a better idea of the tone or style they’re looking for. When you post your demos on your profile, you get to choose from the same list of tag words from which the client chooses.

For each tag word that matches up to the client’s job posting, your VoiceMatch score will increase by 5 points.

6. Not Using a Professional Profile Headshot or Logo

Some people are more visual than others and may remember your picture instead of your name. I know what you’re thinking, “I’m a voice actor, why do I need to show people what I look like?”

A good profile picture is important for a couple of reasons, it builds trust, adds personality, helps with a connection and it’s just par for the course in the entertainment industry.

A neat fact for you to know is that when we did a click test to see where clients clicked the most on the website, they clicked more often on a portrait than anything else. It’s time to upload your picture! To read more on this topic and learn about what makes a great headshot, click here.

7. Telling Everyone You’re a Beginner

Please remember that you’re selling your services and want potential clients to have confidence that you’ll be easy to work with. I would never suggest that you lie about your experience, but let’s focus on something more positive.

Some examples would be, what your voice sounds like, your skills, what you’re interested in or other relatable experience. You want your clients to feel comfortable about working with you. Clients are always looking for a new voice, but they don’t need to know this could be one of your first recordings.

Check out this article called “Fake It Till You Make It” by Deborah Sale Butler for some more tips.

8. Inconsistency Between your Voices.com Profile and other Marketing Materials

Unfortunately not everyone is going to remember your name and everything about you and your voice.

It’s important to help clients to remember you by making your website and your profile similar. Use the same pictures, logos, slogans and descriptions of your voice. That way when someone visits your profile and then later comes across your website, they’ll remember and recognize you.

9. Not Enough Information Under the Studio Section

Be sure to fill out the type of microphone, computer and software you’re using. This information can be very important for the client to know. They may be looking for someone that has a microphone that will match up with others that are being used for the same production.

Let the client know if you have an ISDN line, ipDTL, Source-Connect or a phone patch under “special equipment.” Be sure to list a quick turnaround time. It’s reasonable to offer a 24-hour turnaround time for a project under 1000 words.

10. Not Enough Special Skills or Age Ranges Selected

If you only have young adult selected for your age range, you will only see jobs posted under that age range. You’ll be surprised how easy it is to crossover into another range.

Why not open yourself up to the middle aged category? You’ll be able to see the details of the job and decide for yourself if it’s right for you. The same theory applies to the special skills areas. If you only have radio and television selected, you’re missing out on everything else. Business, internet and education are actually the most popular categories on Voices.com.

There you have it, my friends. Too many times do we hear from talent that are frustrated only to find out that a simple profile change would have made the all the difference, so now it’s time to go fill out or edit your profile!

Best wishes,
Jennifer Smith

8 COMMENTS

  1. I have just finished reading and can’t express how valuable this information is for our talent to understand. This piece is going to generate countless opportunities for our talent and ensure they are making the most out of our service!
    Very well written Jennifer, looking forward to future posts.
    -Mike
    Voices.com employee

  2. I want to offer my spoken word for the benefit of all less privileged brothers and sisters who cannot see, who are not having confidence to speak in public and develop positive thinking and attitude. How can I do that through your helpful site.
    Best wishes and regards.
    I am a regular blogger in gmail for students and serious learners of English and Hindi and Tamil.

  3. Thank you very much for this article! I already had my coffee but I did take valuable notes! This is just the information I needed to polish up my Voices.com profile for 2016. I did have one question or request- Could you clarify what you meant I section 4-” If you add demos to several categories you’ll see higher VoiceMatch scores for jobs in all of your areas of expertise.” If you could send a reply to my email, I would love to understand this better.
    Very Well written article with pointers I will be putting into practice today. Somehow I would like to tell you how these updates have given me paid VO work!
    -Ingrid Johansson

  4. Thank you Michael and Tim for your comments, I’m glad you found the article helpful.
    Hi Ingrid! Thank you for your kind words and question. Let me explain. When you add a demo to say the radio category and then a job is posted in that same category you get 5 extra points on your VoiceMatch score for that job. VoiceMatch assumes that you’re either more interested or more qualified for radio jobs when you have a radio demo. In summary, if you have a demo in every category that you’re interested in, you’ll see high VoiceMatch scores on all jobs posted in those categories. Higher VoiceMatch scores help you to get listened to and get hired!
    I hope that helps! I’m sending you an email with this same information right now.
    Best wishes,
    Jennifer

  5. Hi Gn,
    Thank you for commenting and for your question! I hope my reply finds you well.
    I checked and you already have a profile on Voices.com, otherwise I’d encourage you to create on as a first step. What I’ve done is asked your account manager to follow up with you over the next couple business days to see how we can help you to achieve your goals.
    Warm regards,
    Stephanie

  6. I am middle-aged, but know I can sound both young adult and senior (even child, but I won’t go that far yet). Thanks for the courage to stretch myself and maybe try some things where I know I can sound believable. I’ll be careful not to waste the clients’ time if I don’t sound sincerely the age they are looking for, due to word choice, or what have you. Great information. I love the opportunity Voices.com affords us!

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