6 tips from Voices.com Talent Pro Freelancing

6 Tips From Voices’s Talent Pros

Here at Voices, we love spending every minute of every day on the phone with our talent and clients. Along the way, we hear a lot of inspiring stories.
We’ve also learned a thing or two about what works best as you build your career in this industry – and what behaviors, tactics and strategies might merit a bit of a re-think.
Because sharing knowledge is what we’re all about, we’ve gone straight to the source – our own talent and promotion experts – for some tips on getting your career off the ground, and growing it from there.
Read on for more on how you can tweak your own voice career.

The Experts Speak

We know we’re a little biased, but all of us here at Voices believe passionately in what we do. We are constantly being reminded – on the phone, online and in-person – of the transformative impact our service has had on the lives of countless voice professionals.
In the process, we’ve learned a lot about what works – and what doesn’t – when it comes to managing your voice career. And we’d like to share some of that insight here. So we asked a couple of our in-house experts for some tips on how you can get even more value out of your Voices membership.

As our Talent Account Manager, Jennifer Smith focuses her efforts on helping voice professionals move their careers to the next level. She’s got 14 years of sales and customer service experience, and has become our go-to person for voice actors to speak with when they’re looking to start their online voice over career or for professional voice talent looking to break into the online space.
She shared a few tips on taking your Voices membership to the next level:

  1. Fill out your profile as thoroughly as you possibly can. Your profile is your online calling card, your prime vehicle for marketing yourself to prospective clients. Take the time to describe who you are, your voice skills and your related marketable abilities, with as much detail as you can muster. Your goal is to sell yourself to clients, and this is where you’ll make that happen. At the same time, you want to keep search engine optimization in mind. Be sure to include a number of great demos and related descriptions to ensure you get found by the right people, and are invited to as many jobs as you can handle.
  2. Get into it quickly. We’ve learned from our clients that many of them are so pressed for time that they listen to the first few seconds of a demo before moving on to the next one. They often know within a few seconds of an audition whether a given voice is the right fit. So the best way for you to give them what they’re looking for is to have shorter and more targeted demos. If the client is searching for James Earl Jones, for example, make sure your on-the-money impression hits the mark right off the top of your audition. Don’t bury it.
  3. Use Voices to accelerate your brand-building. Virtually all voice professionals use different tools and techniques to grow their business and their brand. Voices can empower those efforts, allowing talent to connect with lots of prospective clients as quickly as possible. It also makes it easy to build lasting relationships that drive repeat business – literally the engine of growth for so many voice pros. With this in mind, think about how your Voices profile fits into your overall online marketing mix, and make sure you feature it prominently in your outreach efforts.

Evan Wiebe, is Voices’s Promotion Specialist, and his day-to-day work connects him with voice over actors from all over the world, from seasoned professionals to brand-new talent. Evan works closely with them to help them get more out of their membership, and offers up some suggestions for managing your workflow:

  1. Read the Job Descriptions with great care. To really nail an audition, you almost have to get into the head of the client. So take the time to review each Job Description in detail to better understand the client’s intended message, as well as your role in delivering it. By internalizing the script, you’ll “get” the character and will be able to read it in a much more natural manner, with pitch perfect tone and attitude. Take the time to understand the need, and what you must bring to the table – or mic – to really hit the mark.
  2. Learn from the successes of other voice actors by studying their work. Listen to their demos and follow their lead. A great place to start is the weekly Top 100 lists on Voices – including the Top 100 Favorites, Top 100 Most Listens, and Top 100 Recently Hired. These lists give you a closer look at what’s working for other voice actors – and how that might apply to your own work. While you still need to carve out your own voice, it’s perfectly fine to learn from their example and integrate their guidance into your demos and auditions.
  3. Seek feedback. Don’t be afraid to reach out to the people closest to you – friends, family members, colleagues, coaches, or anyone who knows you and your work – and seek fair and constructive feedback. Have them preview your auditions and let you know what you think. They’ll suggest changes – big or small, everything helps – to help you refine your performance and hit the target every time you audition.

As you can imagine, we’re just getting started on how you can make your Voices membership go further. So watch this space for more insight from our team. In the meantime, what’s been working for you? We’d love if you’d share your own tips in a comment.
All the best,
Carmi

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Comments

  • Avatar for William Williams
    William Williams
    February 13, 2015, 6:04 pm

    The only thing I would caution against is having friends and family critique your auditions. It takes a trained ear to understand what a voice over performance should sound like. So you may get conflicting or erroneous advice from folks that are not in this business. However I always say if ten people tell you the same thing you probably should pay attention.

    Reply
  • Avatar for Carmi
    Carmi
    February 18, 2015, 2:31 pm

    Thanks very much for your comment, William. I completely agree: Talent must always be careful about soliciting feedback from people who otherwise aren’t engaged in the field as professionals. I always tend to draw a line between those who know and those who do not, and I’ll weigh feedback from pros differently than I do feedback from, say, my mom.
    I guess some feedback is better than none, but your suggestion to ensure it comes from a trained ear is bang on. I’m so glad you shared this.
    All the best,
    Carmi

    Carmi Levy
    Voices.com

    Reply