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Doing Voice Over Work Online

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Building a voice over business has never been easier – but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t take work. Savvy voice over actors know that in order to find voice over work online, it will involve taking time to prospect the right voice over jobs for your voice.

Here are some tips and tricks to effectively finding voice over auditions and voice over jobs online as well as getting your start in the industry.

Freelance Voice Over Work

The freelance professional lifestyle is often held up as ideal. On the face of it, being a freelancer appears to have a certain amount of freedom and flexibility that others yearn for. And while this certainly is true in many instances, what often goes unmentioned is how those who work gigs, tend to spend far more time looking for employment than traditional employees might suspect.

Working as a freelance voice actor is akin to running a small business. Like any other entrepreneurial endeavor, it takes talent, time, dedication, grit, ingenuity and a passion for lifelong learning.

One estimate indicates that the voice over artist’s job hunt takes up as much as one-quarter to one-third of his or her time. This includes sending out emails, submitting to voice over auditions, attending networking events, creating demo reels and maintaining a website and/or artist profiles on sites such as Voices.com.

Get more tips on understanding your voice over business marketing mix.

8 Steps to Getting a Voice Over Job

Step 1: Take a Voice Over Class
Before you get too far ahead of yourself and buy studio equipment, get training. When you’re exploring voice over as a potential career, taking a class or two, or enrolling in voice over coaching can help you to determine if voice over is the right business for you.

Step 2: Practice Reading Out Loud
Read out loud often so you can really feel the copy, hear your voice, and play with the interpretation. Get over any inhibitions by practicing your reading on a regular basis either on your own, with a teacher, family member or a trusted, objective friend.

Step 3: Seek Out Pro Bono Gigs To Build Your Resume

Consider apprenticing under an established voice actor or volunteering your talents for charities, not-for-profits, or student projects. As you are building your voice over portfolio, it is important to make the distinction between volunteer work and “giving your voice away for free” — your future colleagues will thank you.

Step 4: Network with Other Voice Actors and Build Your Network
While coaching and training are a great place to start – don’t let your networking activities end there! Look for local Meetups, conferences and online communities too. Not only will you find kindred spirits and moral support, you’ll also become part of a powerful referral network. When a job comes their way that they’re not actually well-suited for, voice actors will often recommend other voice talent in their network for these opportunities.

Step 5: Practice Proper Breathing
Remember to breathe properly. This means being able to control your breath and shape it to create flowing phrases and energetic, articulate performances. Breathing deeply from your diaphragm, breath support and proper placement can work miracles and keep you conditioned to deliver in top form, even through sickness.

Step 6: Make a Voice Over Demo
Making a voice over demo is a very personal, artistic and technical process. You can go about doing this on your own but it is advisable to consider the possibilities of having a demo produced for you professionally. Your voice over demo can be your ticket to success and often serves as the first impression of your voice a prospective client will hear.

Step 7: Make a Profile at Voices.com

When you’re ready to pursue voice over work, you’ll need to have a web presence and a steady source of auditions. JoiningvVoices.com is a great way to get your hands on more voice over script copy, your name in front of clients, market your talent on a global scale, and most importantly, get connected to amazing opportunities.

Step 8: Follow-up and be Persistent
When you are pounding the pavement on your own, be sure to follow up with the prospects you have emailed your demos or marketing material to. Keep your name front of mind. You may not receive a response from every person you send your promotional materials to but that shouldn’t deter you from marketing your services. When someone needs your voice, they will get in touch!

Be Selective When Auditioning to Voice Over Jobs Online

No matter whether you’ve been in the voice acting business for a while or are just starting out, when you’re looking for voice over jobs online, it pays to know where to look and what to look for.

For instance, when you’re reviewing a voice over job posting, which has so many different criteria included, such as the vocal requirements, creative direction, roles, vocal styles, and more, the key to whether this is the right job for you, is knowing your own voice and your brand.

Knowing What to Look for in a Voice Over Job Posting

When you first see a job posting that interests you, you want to double-check a few key specifications about the job, including the following:

  • Language, Accent and Dialect: Be honest with the languages, accents and dialects that you can perform in, as many clients can spot an authentic sound from one that’s not as polished. If you’ve received language training or dialect coaching, indicate your level of fluency or comfort with the required language when submitting your audition and proposal.
  • Gender: While some voice actors can convincingly change the gender of their voice, this skill is rare and with the number of opportunities out there for both genders – there’s no need to stress over a job that has requirements that don’t match your skills. There are more opportunities out there that will suit you better!
  • Work type: Different types of work include radio and television commercials, animation for film and cartoons, audiobooks, and so on.
  • Deadline to receive auditions: Consider when the client has set the deadline to receive auditions. If you aren’t able to audition in time or are booked solid when the client needs the voice over recorded, you need to pass on the opportunity. You don’t want to give the impression that you’re available when you aren’t and then potentially disappoint and come across as being unreliable.
  • How the client needs the work delivered: Make sure you’re able to deliver the file in a way that works for the client, such as upload to a website, ISDN, phone patch,  Source-Connect or more.
  • Pay rate: This may be the deal maker or deal breaker for some…Does the pay line up with the amount of work required? Look for a budget range and compare it with the amount of time it will take you to complete the work. Note that you can quote whatever you choose for any voice over job, but never settle for any rates that you feel aren’t in alignment with your worth.

Auditioning

When a script is supplied, it’s best not to read the whole thing in your audition. Read approx 15 seconds or so and then move on.

If you want to try your hand on some voice over sample scripts, these can also be useful to help you stay in fine form for auditioning – or to serve as a copy for your next demo.

When you’re looking for work and different job opportunities, some due diligence on your part can help inform you beforehand when making the decision to audition or not. In addition to other factors, you also need to weigh the opportunity with your own values and beliefs before pursuing it. Your integrity is far more important than making a quick buck.

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Comments

  • Vandana Arleen Xavier
    June 7, 2019, 4:40 am

    I am interested in giving my voice to the cartoon or animation programmes…I have no idea how to start or who to contact….I can talk like a small baby….and few sounds…

    Reply
  • Fred Williams
    August 1, 2019, 7:28 pm

    I have a rich, natural baritone voice that has been honed by years as an operatic and classical singer.
    My reading skills are amazing and interpreting story line strong.
    I have no idea as to where I might go to break into this specialty field. I did do several voice overs on Spokane on a per job basis in the radio station.

    Reply
  • fred logue
    August 2, 2019, 10:36 am

    How do I get started?

    Reply
  • Eliud
    August 3, 2019, 9:54 am

    Very informative, would wish some mention on how to do the voice recordings through phone.

    Reply
  • Melanie Dotson
    August 4, 2019, 1:37 pm

    Hello,
    Everyone always tell me I have such A Nice Voice… i would love to see if Anyone would be interested in me yet I dont know where to begin…Please. Could someone reply to me and lead me in the right direction.
    Thank-you!

    Melanie

    Reply